Chamber Music

  • Title: Chamber Music
  • Author: James Joyce
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 406
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Chamber Music This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers You may find it for free on the web Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery
    This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers You may find it for free on the web Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

    • Unlimited [Religion Book] ↠ Chamber Music - by James Joyce ✓
      406 James Joyce
    • thumbnail Title: Unlimited [Religion Book] ↠ Chamber Music - by James Joyce ✓
      Posted by:James Joyce
      Published :2019-010-21T00:21:39+00:00

    About James Joyce


    1. James Joyce, Irish novelist, noted for his experimental use of language in such works as Ulysses 1922 and Finnegans Wake 1939 Joyce s technical innovations in the art of the novel include an extensive use of interior monologue he used a complex network of symbolic parallels drawn from the mythology, history, and literature, and created a unique language of invented words, puns, and allusions James Joyce was born in Dublin, on February 2, 1882, as the son of John Stanislaus Joyce, an impoverished gentleman, who had failed in a distillery business and tried all kinds of professions, including politics and tax collecting Joyce s mother, Mary Jane Murray, was ten years younger than her husband She was an accomplished pianist, whose life was dominated by the Roman Catholic Church In spite of their poverty, the family struggled to maintain a solid middle class facade.From the age of six Joyce, was educated by Jesuits at Clongowes Wood College, at Clane, and then at Belvedere College in Dublin 1893 97 In 1898 he entered the University College, Dublin Joyce s first publication was an essay on Ibsen s play When We Dead Awaken It appeared in the Fortnightly Review in 1900 At this time he also began writing lyric poems.After graduation in 1902 the twenty year old Joyce went to Paris, where he worked as a journalist, teacher and in other occupations under difficult financial conditions He spent a year in France, returning when a telegram arrived saying his mother was dying Not long after her death, Joyce was traveling again He left Dublin in 1904 with Nora Barnacle, a chambermaid who he married in 1931 Joyce published Dubliners in 1914, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man in 1916, a play Exiles in 1918 and Ulysses in 1922 In 1907 Joyce had published a collection of poems, Chamber Music.At the outset of the First World War, Joyce moved with his family to Z rich In Z rich Joyce started to develop the early chapters of Ulysses, which was first published in France because of censorship troubles in the Great Britain and the United States, where the book became legally available only in 1933 In March 1923 Joyce started in Paris his second major work, Finnegans Wake, suffering at the same time chronic eye troubles caused by glaucoma The first segment of the novel appeared in Ford Madox Ford s transatlantic review in April 1924, as part of what Joyce called Work in Progress The final version was published in 1939.Some critics considered the work a masterpiece, though many readers found it incomprehensible After the fall of France in WWII, Joyce returned to Z rich, where he died on January 13, 1941, still disappointed with the reception of Finnegans Wake.


    979 Comments


    1. Meet James Joyce, The Poet. Sipping the morning coffee, you can soak in the simplicity of his prose and feel the warm coffee for a few seconds more. There is no need to either refer a dictionary to get meanings of complicated words or meander deep between the lines to catch a hidden message. The verses are without the excess of metaphors and the shine of verbose portmanteaus. But they do usher in, the spring of life.The playfulness of heart, in its pristine beauty, is captured in this beautiful [...]

      Reply

    2. XVIIBecause your voice was at my sideI gave him pain,Because within my hand I heldYour hand again.There is no word nor any signCan make amend ----He is a stranger to me nowWho was my friend.

      Reply

    3. These are really good poems, mostly in a very simplistic (I know that sounds crazy -it's James Joyce) lyrical way. Many of these poems have had music added and have been turned into songs. (My brother is a classical singer and actually performs three from this collection.) I picture these being somewhat like the word turned out by a young Stephen Dedalus between A Portrait and Ulysses. II think that to really enjoy this, one must enjoy Joyce and poetry, which puts you in a very small minority. I [...]

      Reply

    4. There's music along the riverFor Love wanders thereO lonely watcher of the skiesDo you hear the night wind and sighsOne who is singing by your gateHis song is softer than the dewMy love goes slowly, bending toHer shadow on the grassLove is unhappy when love is awayA music of sighs: Arise, ariseFrom dewy dreams, my soul, ariseThe trees are full of sighsHe who has sorrow Shall have restRains has all the dayThe leaves lie thick upon the wayOf memoriesAll around our lonelinessThe wind is whistling m [...]

      Reply

    5. A collection of small, beautiful poems written by James Joyce, a master of the English language. Lyrically charming love tales with an air of melancholy, as if it were from a young man with the common feeling that he will never find love - in fact, that's exactly what it is: "When I wrote [Chamber Music], I was a lonely boy, walking about by myself at night and thinking that one day a girl would love me."The last poem in particular is just simply wonderful; indeed, Yeats called it a "technical a [...]

      Reply

    6. A perfectly average collection of poems that recalls Wordsworth and early Blake, though not as good as these two unfortunately. Probably it just serves as a curiosity for Joyce's enthusiasts.

      Reply

    7. Believe it or not, James Joyce's collection of poems contains some of the easiest, simple works of poetry I have ever read! While this may be surprising (this is the guy that wrote an entire pun filled book destroying and combining words to create objectively the most challenging work of English literature by fard he made it last over six hundred pagesd it doesn't have a clear story at all in the first place), it's certainly not a bad thing. Joyce takes advantage of the simplicity on the surface [...]

      Reply

    8. I have a few Complete Works ebooks loaded into my e-reader, James Joyce being one of them. And I wanted to read Dubliners. And since the works were arrange chronologically this was placed before that title. So I started reading it and it was quite a surprise. It seems to be a collection of love poems. A little naive and innocent? The lines were simple and straightforward but had an easy flow to them with a certain quaint attractiveness. Not exactly what I expected from what I have heard of Joyce [...]

      Reply

    9. Due to the exquisite beauty of the first poem and great talent shown in the last, I was almost ready to give 5 stars, but some really poor poetry in between - so it's only 4.

      Reply

    10. telelib/authors/J/Joyc <3

      Reply

    11. کتابم بسته شد / نخواندم بیش / خیره در رقصِ آتش / در اتاقِ خویش. / کتاب را ترک کرده ام / اتاق را ترک کرده ام / چرا که آوازِ تو را شنیدم / از لا به لای سیاهیِ تشویش My book was closed / I read no more / watching the fire dance / On the floor. /I have left my book / I have left my room / For I heard you singing / Through the gloom ---------------افسوس! افسوس! / از باده [...]

      Reply

    12. I haven’t read my fair share of poetry. At least not ones I find tolerable. Sure, I can read poetry—though most times I find the age of the dialect can be strenuous to understand. Growing up around /conservative/ conservative Christians, I’d obviously stumbled upon such language in the verses I’d read in a Holy Bible. ‘Thou,’ ‘dost,’ ‘art,’ ‘canst,’ and ‘hast,’ among many other older verbiages became easy to pick up on. It became more a matter of piecing the sentence [...]

      Reply

    13. It's a collection of love poems and they are really really beautiful and made of gentle verses. I love it. I would like to read it again and again, maybe every once a year. If you are wondering about love or thinking about love or feeling about love, this book is a must. Here's one of my favorite piece:"Along with us the summer windWent murmuring — O, happily! —But softer than the breath of summerWas the kiss she gave to me."Although James Joyce said 'when he wrote these poems he was a lonel [...]

      Reply

    14. I have not yet read an entire James Joyce book, but this collection of poems are direct and simple - which is too far from what I know about him. Although, I think the style seemed fitting with his incorporation of music, nature and melancholy on the lines.The theme of the collection is predominantly about love.I.Strings in the earth and airMake music sweet;Strings by the river whereThe willows meetThere's music along the riverFor love wanders there,Pale flowers on his mantle,Dark leaves on his [...]

      Reply

    15. Lovely charming poetry but verse is evidently not Joyce´s calling as a writer and he knew it. Chamber Music is stronger as a unified work, and the poems don´t stand apart from each other all that much, nor do they do anything for me personally. That´s not of course to say they can´t do anything for anybody else. But for the most part this collection is best appreciated by fans of this style of poetry and Joyce fanatics.

      Reply

    16. Names his first book after the act of urinating. I fucking love this guy.Joyce at his most accesible, which doesn't make him any less good: the man can still conjure some of the prettiest lines to be found in English language (see Poems 28 and 36).

      Reply

    17. Joyce has never been a favourite, but I would always choose Dubliners over this. The repetition and simple lack of metre Poetry is not his forte.

      Reply

    18. Now I can technically say yes when someone asks me if I've read any Joyce.

      Reply

    19. Given that James Joyce is mostly known for his large, experimental novels, I find it interesting that his first published work is a collection of short, rather conventional love poems. To add to that, there is nothing particularly difficult about them – save for a few instances where I found the vocabulary a bit challenging, Chamber Music is relatively straightforward and easy to read.This is not the type of book I would describe as epic or breathtaking – rather, it reads like a collection o [...]

      Reply

    20. Some of Joyce's early poems. Bare, melodic, totally drab compared to his later prose. If it hadn't had Joyce's name on the cover this would have been totally unremarkable. Only the last poem elevates this collection of uneventful love poems to something worthwhile to read. I hear an army charging upon the land,And the thunder of horses plunging, foam about their knees:Arrogant, in black armour, behind them stand,Disdaining the reins, with fluttering whips, the charioteers.They cry unto the night [...]

      Reply

    21. For Joyce, this is very light and very transparent writing. Its enjoyable and one can follow the themes of newly found love, yearning and friendship fairly easily. I believe that these poems were produced in the 1906 timeframe while Joyce was still in Dublin. I particularly enjoyed verse XVII:Because your voice was at my sideI gave him pain,Because within my hand I heldYour hand again.There is no word nor any signCan make amend—He is a stranger to me nowWho was my friend.Later in his career Jo [...]

      Reply

    22. This small collection of lyric poems has a good deal going for it. Joyce clearly had command of meter, and most lines are very musical to the reading ear. I am surprised that there is little innovation or creativity of language, but there are no forced rhymes and everything seems to flow smoothly. There are no wasted words or phrases. Though there are some nice lines and nice sentiments, the collection, as a whole, is merely that: nice. I'm sure any lover would be thrilled to receive one of thes [...]

      Reply

    23. Unlike Joyce's prose these poems are straightforward and simplistic. I am not one for lovey-dovey romantic stuff and somehow didn't feel much while reading through these verses. They are a bit too sweet for my taste or perhaps I am just too bitter to enjoy them. Nonetheless, I am capable of recognizing their beauty and quality.Here comes the one poem I will take with me:BE NOT sad because all men Prefer a lying clamour before you:Sweetheart, be at peace again— Can they dishonour you?They are s [...]

      Reply

    24. I was pleasantly surprised by this slim collection of early poetry by Joyce. It's a lot more flowery and romantic than I would ever imagine Joyce poems being; but clearly the poems were written in a youthful state of exuberance in which love is most conspicuously on the mind. While simple, the poems are clearly well crafted, and some particular ones are quite unexpectedly superb. Most of it is not stop-the-presses kind of great poetry, but it's melodious and charming enough to warrant attention. [...]

      Reply

    25. Oh people will hate me for this but Jame Joyce's "Chamber Music" just isn't all that good. Simple as that. Now, of course, the magic of poetry is that it hits everyone's soul differently, and maybe this particular collection of poems just isn't my cup of tea, but truth be told, I would be hard pressed to find anyone who liked it. So why give it 2 stars? Well because it wasn't aweful, just dull, boring and unoriginal. There wasn't one poem in it that grabbed me. Still I will give Joyce the benefi [...]

      Reply

    26. I must own to being somewhat surprised by Joyce's Chamber Music. Simply put it is a collection of 36 beautiful, elegant, straight forward, lyrical love poems. You won't find any of the visceral brutal reality, bawdy humour or mind bending stream of conscious narratives that are the hallmarks of Joyce's more famous works and what make him both so frustrating and such a pleasure to read. I really enjoyed this short collection of poems and it was even nicer to discover this gentler side of an autho [...]

      Reply

    27. I was going to give this 3 stars but the last poems, as last poems generally do, softened my heart. This was my first encounter with the poetry of James Joyce, it was sweet and soft and romantic, and best read aloud, very musical, it reminded me of W.B.Yeats, except, to be perfectly honest, far far less gripping. Joyce is an extraordinary prose writer, and a sweet, but not very groundbreaking poet.

      Reply

    28. The poetry of James JoyceWhile often thought of more for his stories than his poetry, his verse and mastery of poetic device showcase the prolific writing skills possessed by James Joyce. While the rhyme and pentameter will likely seem dated to readers of modern day poetry, it is good to remark that in his day his poetry was considered innovative and groundbreaking. There are many gems and gold nuggets to be found in this treasury.

      Reply

    29. I'd never read any of Joyce's poetry before. I was pleasantly surprised. His imagery is very easy to "feel" and visualize, his word choice develops an interesting web of connotation from one piece to the next, and it wasn't overbearing like some poetry can be. Overall, this was an unexpectedly quick read, but I did enjoy it.

      Reply

    30. Phew, nothing much here, move along. Expected a bit more from the man who gifted us Ulysses. A collection of dull poems, nothing too shiny. Would have maybe been great if it was written earlier, but, like its namesake, it really is just a load of piss.Lots of overused elements here, many comparisons to the moon and the soul, etc. Three stars because they could be very nice music.

      Reply

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *