The Poison Principle: A Memoir of Family Secrets and Literary Poisonings

  • Title: The Poison Principle: A Memoir of Family Secrets and Literary Poisonings
  • Author: Gail Bell
  • ISBN: 9780333989159
  • Page: 454
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Poison Principle A Memoir of Family Secrets and Literary Poisonings a memoir about family secrets and literary po
    a memoir about family secrets and literary po

    • Best Read [Gail Bell] é The Poison Principle: A Memoir of Family Secrets and Literary Poisonings || [Cookbooks Book] PDF ✓
      454 Gail Bell
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Gail Bell] é The Poison Principle: A Memoir of Family Secrets and Literary Poisonings || [Cookbooks Book] PDF ✓
      Posted by:Gail Bell
      Published :2020-03-10T04:13:33+00:00

    About Gail Bell


    1. Gail Bell Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Poison Principle: A Memoir of Family Secrets and Literary Poisonings book, this is one of the most wanted Gail Bell author readers around the world.


    151 Comments


    1. this is one of those fascinating books where you don’t know quite what you are about to learn from one page to the next. If you too love learning more about poisons and those who administer them, you can’t go wrong with this book. Even for those of you who don’t have quite the same niche interest as me, there is plenty to ponder on the literary side, those myths, fairy tales through Shakespeare and Gustave Flaubert’s Madame Bovary and taking in a few other’s along the way.The backbone [...]

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    2. ‘Poison is rarely if ever perfect.’In 1927, William Macbeth apparently poisoned two of his sons with strychnine. William Macbeth was Gail Bell’s grandfather, and he died before she was born. When Gail was ten, her grandfather’s sample case was delivered to her father. She opened one of the bottles in the case, and put the end of the stopper to her nose. ‘My father snatched it from my hand and said ‘Never, never do that. You could die.’In 1980, Ms Bell spoke with her Great-Aunt Rose [...]

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    3. This is a weird comparison to make, since the subject matter is very different, but I had the same problem with this book as I did with The Bling Ring: there's too much information and too little analysis. Bell decided to tackle her family history, the different concepts of poisoners throughout the entire history of time AND threw in a bunch of very literary prose that had nothing to do with real life. In the end, it was a lot of ideas thrown at you without much thought behind them. The story ab [...]

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    4. Pedantic! Hard work.

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    5. Quite a satisfying non-fiction book about poisons, poisoners and the poisoned. The author’s family has its own poisoned past, the investigation of which she threads through the narrative. More of a “researched stream of consciousness”, as my friend Libby said, than a manifesto of any kind, I have to say I did get a bit frustrated towards the end with all Bell’s wafty semi-philosophical ramblings when all I wanted to know really was if her grandfather really poisoned his sons or not. (Obv [...]

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    6. I'm a huge fan of (auto)biographies. I don't know why, but I'm sure there's a good reason for it. I'm also a little on the morbid side, being an archaeologist. Exploring a cemetery/graveyard is a fun way to spend an afternoon and is probably why I'm so fond of churches, since the two are commonly associated. I've exhumed graves and sorted out physical anthropology collections (ie: boxes of skeletons). I have a somewhat irreverent attitude to death and the dead. I'm fond of murder mysteries and I [...]

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    7. This book is a fascinating read - it is a mixture of family histories and the investigation work that went in to exploring it. It is also part science book since the author has a grounding in pharmacy and chemistry explaining the types and processes of poisons and their historical significance. This is a riveting book which educates on many levels. I will admit being a chemist myself this was of particular interest to me (no I am not going to poison anyone) since it brings what can be a very aca [...]

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    8. I found this to be an interesting mix of memoir, mystery and the history of poisons and poisonings. Gail Bell's inspiration to write this was the story of her own grandfather, a quack tonic maker and snake oil salesman, who was supposed to have poisoned two of his sons. Gail herself became a chemist, leading her to dig into her family's hidden past, and question what drives people to poison others. (This book was published under Poison: A History and Family Memoir and The Poisoner - A Story of F [...]

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    9. Well crafted structurally: the mystery of the family poisoning is drawn out cleverly through various fascinating digressions and case studies. Poetic and literary in places. An unusual non-fiction read.

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    10. Each chapter starts with a tale of poisoning then goes in to a ramble, so I got to the point quite quickly where I skipped most of each chapter aefter the first few pages. They were interesting though.

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    11. A fascinating book. Informative and interesting.I wouldn't read this as a story book. It's part memoir part research thesis without the dense academic writing.

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    12. One of the most beautifully written true crime books.

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    13. I've registered this book at bookcrossing with the following Id:505-4843249

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