The Killing Machine

  • Title: The Killing Machine
  • Author: Jack Vance
  • ISBN: 9780879979386
  • Page: 394
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Killing Machine Having brought arch villain Malagate the Woe to justice Gersen now sets his sights on Kokor Hekkus another of the Demon Princes The name Kokor Hekkus which means killing machine in the language of
    Having brought arch villain Malagate the Woe to justice, Gersen now sets his sights on Kokor Hekkus, another of the Demon Princes The name Kokor Hekkus, which means killing machine in the language of the planet Thamber, does not refer to Hekkus s own predilection for homicide, but to his fondness for horrific and murderous devices, including the giant robotic executioneHaving brought arch villain Malagate the Woe to justice, Gersen now sets his sights on Kokor Hekkus, another of the Demon Princes The name Kokor Hekkus, which means killing machine in the language of the planet Thamber, does not refer to Hekkus s own predilection for homicide, but to his fondness for horrific and murderous devices, including the giant robotic executioner that first gained him his nickname.The Killing Machine is part 2 of 5 of The Demon Princes Series.The Demon Princes is a five book series of science fiction novels by Jack Vance, which cumulatively relate the story of one Kirth Gersen as he exacts his revenge on five notorious criminals, collectively known as the Demon Princes, who carried his village off into slavery during his childhood Each novel deals with his pursuit of one of the five Princes.

    • Free Read [Humor and Comedy Book] ☆ The Killing Machine - by Jack Vance ↠
      394 Jack Vance
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Humor and Comedy Book] ☆ The Killing Machine - by Jack Vance ↠
      Posted by:Jack Vance
      Published :2019-07-06T00:09:40+00:00

    About Jack Vance


    1. Aka John Holbrooke Vance, Peter Held, John Holbrook, Ellery Queen, John van See, Alan Wade.The author was born in 1916 and educated at the University of California, first as a mining engineer, then majoring in physics and finally in journalism During the 1940s and 1950s, he contributed widely to science fiction and fantasy magazines His first novel, The Dying Earth, was published in 1950 to great acclaim He won both of science fiction s most coveted trophies, the Hugo and Nebula awards He also won an Edgar Award for his mystery novel The Man in the Cage He lived in Oakland, California in a house he designed.


    804 Comments


    1. 4.5 stars. This is the second book of the Demon Princes series and shows Jack Vance at his best. A terrific, fun read. Classic SF at its best.

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    2. ORIGINALLY POSTED AT Fantasy Literature.After successfully dispatching the first of his lifelong enemies in the previous novel, The Star King, Kirth Gersen now takes on the second of the five demon princes, Kokor Hekkus, aka "The Killing Machine." The Killing Machine is even more fun than The Star King. It's full of diverse characters, exotic venues, hilarious fashions, weird food, awesome architecture, and bizarre machinery. Nobody outdoes Jack Vance for sheer inventiveness. The plot moves rapi [...]

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    3. I recorded all of Jack Vance's Demon Princes books in 50-55 minute episodes for Golden Hours, my local radio service for blind and reading-impaired listeners. Too bad I didn't make CD copies for myself, since the radio station broadcast the tape versions and then erased them too reuse.I guess I'll have to re-record them for Golden Hours and this time keep a copy, since Jack Vance has a wicked and sardonic sense of humor that I really enjoy, and this series of books is his absolute best.I especia [...]

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    4. The second in a series of five called The Demon Princes, this is 1960’s science fiction at its best. Kirth Gersen’s family and friends were killed by a group of five horrendously terrible men, and Gersen is on a galaxy-wide rampage to track down and eliminate them, one by one. In this instalment, his target is Kokor Hekkus, who is hiding in a far remote planet that is known only in legend. Well-written, imaginative, engrossing, fun -- everything a gal needs to remove her from the stick-in-th [...]

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    5. Two down, three to go.

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    6. De Moordmachine van Jack Vance, ISB nummer 90 290 2018 0, vierde druk 1983, Uitgever Meulenhoff SF nummer 32. Tweede deel van de Duivelsprinsen reeks.Ik krijg wel bij het invullen van het ISB nummer de hit op dat dit de Sterrekoning zou zijn.Eerste druk is van 1970, ook uitgegeven door Meulenhoff. Copyright is vastgesteld in 1964 en oorspronkelijke titel is The Killing Machine, Berkeley Books New York.Vertaling door Mark Carpentier Alting en de omslag is van Tom Barber.Ook in dit geval: De cove [...]

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    7. Stayed up a bit late to finish this one, the sequel to "The Star King" and prequel to three more. More extensive review under "The Demon Princes".

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    8. A good example of why Jack Vance is one of my favourite authors.

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    9. The Killing Machine is the second novel in the five book series by Jack Vance called The Demon Princes. It was first published as a novel in 1964 and is still in print. My copy is 136 pages long, making it the shortest book in the series. I read it several years ago and rated it a 4 but after reading it a second time I am rating it a 5. It remains my favorite of the first three books of the series. This time Kirth Gersen is looking for the star king named Kokor Hekkus, one of the five star kings [...]

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    10. Julian introduced me to Vance's Demon Princes series. I found the first book, The Star King, witty and erudite, and so was quick to pick up the second and third volumes from the used-paperback section at Uncle Hugo's.The Killing Machine is not quite as sharp as the first volume, and the analog space noir seems more quaint this time around. Vance is at his best when the prose is terse and the dialogue is clever, and when his hero Kirth Gersen relies on his wits instead of his brawn. The action mo [...]

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    11. The second chapter of the "vengeance race" against the 5 more terrible criminals of all the Oikumene.e Demon Princes!This second installment take us in a plethora of new worlds and beyond and introduces us to Interchange,the first nearly legal outlaw market of the Universe,where every kidnapper can bring his victims to rescind his fees,even being helped closing the negotiations in order to satisfy both the parts!!As usual,the imagination and inventiveness of the author transport the reader in an [...]

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    12. I wish there were half-star options on , as this would be a good example of a 4.5-star book. Very very good, but not quite perfect. The story is better than Star King (the first of the series); more coherent and with more drama and reversals. The protagonist arguably has it a little too easy (thus 4.5 and not 5 stars), but it's a very solid story.

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    13. Witty dialog, imaginative setting, and sympathetic hero.

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    14. Second of the Demon Princes, and continuing the unrelenting chase of Kirth Gersen. It doesn't let up and it is great.

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    15. The basic premise of this story is that the protagonist is hunting down 1 of the 5 "Demon Princes". It tells a complete story, but at the end of the book I concluded that the author had written this with sequels in mind. Going online, I discovered that this is actually the 2nd book in a 5 part series; that might have been useful to know before I started reading it! In fairness, it stands up fairly well on its own, but I'd have liked some kind of prologue/recap. I haven't read the 1st book, so I [...]

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    16. Secondo libro della saga dei Principi Demoni, secondo giro sulla ruota della vendetta stellare di Kirth Gersen. E ancora una volta, pienamente soddisfatto.Rispetto al capitolo precedente ho apprezzato di più il fatto che vengano mostrati aspetti della personalità di Gersen che erano rimasti in ombra. Gersen non è un paladino dei buoni senza macchia e senza paura, ma un uomo profondamente ossessionato e infelice impegnato in una fatica interminabile (e lui è consapevole di questo) che alla fi [...]

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    17. Continuing this reviewer’s quest to discover science-fiction and fantasy he didn’t read in his teens, reading Jack Vance’s The Killing Machine has been an enjoyable part of the journey. The Killing Machine continues Kirth Gersen’s quest to rid the universe of the five demon princes (hence the name of the pentalogy series alternating with other readings and reviews) who massacred his family along with its community in a coordinated action, The Mount Pleasant Massacre. Part interstellar Ja [...]

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    18. Despite the higher average rating than its predecessor, The Killing Machine struck me as another good-but-nothing-special work of science fiction.The novella is entertaining, but nothing much about it stuck in my mind as particularly brilliant. The only noteworthy points of the work seemed, unfortunately, to be negative ones. The short length of the work actually hurts it, in my opinion. The plot moves quickly between different settings and small sub-plots. The 160 or so page work ranges in its [...]

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    19. I very much enjoyed the first book in the Demon Princes series, and The Killing Machine was quite good as well. At the end of this second book I feel like I've come to understand Vance pretty well as a writer and its interesting to see what from the first book becomes stylistic and what falls by the wayside. I didn't fully realize what it is about Vance's writing that is so distinctive, but I think I've hit on at least one thing.For now, ill discuss the stiltedness/formality/pretense in which he [...]

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    20. I have re-read all five books of The Demon Princes series at least seven times. I own all five in hardbound editions, signed by the author. I give The Killing Machine four stars only in comparison with the final three of the series, especially the final two. What makes this series stand out from all others is the quality of the villains. Kokkor Hekus is easier to relate to than the villain of the first book, Malagate. Yet he is not one the reader will be the least inclined to personally identify [...]

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    21. I recorded all of Jack Vance's Demon Princes books in 50-55 minute episodes for Golden Hours, my local radio service for blind and reading-impaired listeners. Too bad I didn't make CD copies for myself, since the radio station broadcast the tape versions and then erased them too reuse.I guess I'll have to re-record them for Golden Hours and this time keep a copy, since Jack Vance has a wicked and sardonic sense of humor that I really enjoy, and this series of books is his absolute best.I especia [...]

      Reply

    22. Kirth Gersen is still the central character in this novel, is he really becoming the killing machine? Can he remain a normal human being and continue his quest for revenge? To younger readers used to much thicker novels, I would say that this is really a sub-novel of the Demon Princes book and if you read all five in the series it's still only about half the length of a Brandon Sanderson novel. It does have some of the old fashion tropes, damsel in distress and secondary weak female characters b [...]

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    23. An improvement on the first novel in almost every way - a tighter, more coherent plot, a more immediate and compelling villain, a consistent sense of world, and brief to the point that readers have to connect some dots themselves. Vance's use of archaic language in an interstellar setting lends the world a mythic quality. His characters - even minor ones - invariably give the impression that they have lives and desires and motivations that overlap only incompletely with what happens in the story [...]

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    24. Jack Vance is such an anomoly. He's a strange amalgum of Van Vogt-ish over the top science fantasy (almost Edgar Rice Burroughs at points, even!) and Philip K. Dick-y ultra-modernism. But, in saying all that, I also have to say that there is simply no one like Jack Vance. Seemingly out of control half the time, every once in a while the focus shifts and you feel like the man has a massive master plan.This second book of The Demon Princes series is where I learned to trust Vance completely. Giant [...]

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    25. The Demon Princes series is turning out to have more in common with a mystery than a space adventure. Kirth Gersen's tasks so far have been to track down and identify the villains. The path do doing so is delightfully roundabout, and Girsten might be monomaniacal about vengeance upon the Demon Princes, but his methods can be subtle when necessary.Vance is no technologist and no futurist: amidst the intersplit FTL drive and projac pistols, the characters use paper money, handle photographs, and r [...]

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    26. I had not read Jack Vance in a while, and it's my first time reading it in english. It's the first time I prefer the translated work.The needlessly old-fashioned vocabulary (why scold when you can objurgate!) makes for a difficult read, and the plot is thin enough already. The one-dimensionality of the characters, specially the main one, is explained away on a thin motivational basis.Of course it also has the classic Vance world-building, a feeling that it all makes sense and is part of a much l [...]

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    27. I think this is getting the fourth star just for the sheer intricacy of some of the trickery the hero of this revenge classic pulls off. The titular villain of this book is not as fascinating as Mallagate the Woe, but that, I would say is because we don't get closely acquainted with him. I actually found myself much more intrigued by the character, Alusz, who seemed a female throw in, maybe a temporary love interest, but turns out to be a little more fascinating than you think she is. A fun read [...]

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    28. Deeper and in many ways far more complex than volume one, but requiring a lot of heavy duty deciphering by a reader. Alas, it's great sixties sci-fi, but it's still 1954 in its treatment of women who were consigned to be drudges, brainless bimbos (Pallis Atwode in the Star King) or brainless damsels in distress (Alusz in the Killing Machine.) the best character was the hapless machine shop owner, Patch.

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    29. This was SF in the early 60s. Reminds me of Christopher Priestor A. E. Van Vogt. One of a series of five detailing a man's questfor revenge in the distant future.This is very different from Vance's later style. Some would describeit as wooden. 'Deadpan' or 'hardboiled' are some other terms that comes to mind. Not a 'sense of wonder' kind of SF tale. It's more like a crime story with spaceships.

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