The Square

  • Title: The Square
  • Author: In-hun Choi Kim Seong-Kon
  • ISBN: 9781628970678
  • Page: 409
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Square This groundbreaking classic of Korean modernism tackles the shattering effect of the division of Korea Taking place just before the Korean War it follows its protagonist as he travels to the North ho
    This groundbreaking classic of Korean modernism tackles the shattering effect of the division of Korea Taking place just before the Korean War, it follows its protagonist as he travels to the North hoping to escape what he sees as the repressive right wing regime in the Southy to find that a different sort of lie reigns in the so called worker s paradise Implying tThis groundbreaking classic of Korean modernism tackles the shattering effect of the division of Korea Taking place just before the Korean War, it follows its protagonist as he travels to the North hoping to escape what he sees as the repressive right wing regime in the Southy to find that a different sort of lie reigns in the so called worker s paradise Implying that both communism and capitalism are pernicious infections from without, The Square is a dark and complex story of the ways ideologies can destroy the individual.

    • Best Download [In-hun Choi Kim Seong-Kon] ☆ The Square || [Historical Fiction Book] PDF ✓
      409 In-hun Choi Kim Seong-Kon
    • thumbnail Title: Best Download [In-hun Choi Kim Seong-Kon] ☆ The Square || [Historical Fiction Book] PDF ✓
      Posted by:In-hun Choi Kim Seong-Kon
      Published :2019-07-15T00:40:17+00:00

    About In-hun Choi Kim Seong-Kon


    1. Choi In hun was born in 1936 in Hoeryong City, North Hamgyong Province, which is now in North Korea When the Korean War broke out in 1950, he and his family fled to South Korea aboard a U.S Navy ship He studied law at Seoul National University, but joined the army without completing his final semester His began publishing fiction while in the army, and was discharged in 1963 From 1977 2001, he served as a Professor of Creative Writing at the Seoul Institute of the Arts.


    978 Comments


    1. A story written by a then 24 year old Choi In-Hun follows our philosophy student protagonist Lee Myong-jun torn between North and South Korea. Lee is exactly the sort of introspective, narcissist 20-something philosophy student you’d expect, wrestling with his righteous indignation and somewhat misogynistic tendencies. He wears his overly earnest heart on his sleeve and is frankly a mess. Disillusioned by the corruption of the South he escapes to the North but instead of finding the excitement [...]

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    2. Coming-of-Age in the Korean WarOn January 2, 1952, fifteen months before the signing of the Armistice Agreement that would end the combat phase of the Korean War, the United States delivered a proposal for the voluntary repatriation of prisoners to the negotiators at Panmunjom. Communists opposed the proposal because it violated the 1949 Geneva Convention, a document signed by the United States, which called for the automatic repatriation of POWs. The issue of repatriation is at the center of Ch [...]

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    3. Choi In-hun’s The Square (translated by Kim Seong-kon, review copy courtesy of the publisher) follows Lee Myong-jun, a released prisoner from the Korean War. Having been set free during one of the interludes in the conflict, he’s on a boat headed for a neutral country, having decided to look for a new life away from the peninsula. In between chats with one of the officers, and his attempts to keep his fellow refugees in order, he stands at the stern of the boat, looking out to sea and reflec [...]

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    4. The Square by Choi In-hun is an examination through a fictional story of the division of Korea into two systems that continues to this day. In Choi's commentary about his story in the 1960s even Choi could not believe the separation had lasted that long. The Korean people are of one race and the history of the country spans 5000 years. The separation is strictly an ideological one.The main character Lee Myong-jun plays out both sides of this on-going conflict. He starts in South Korea but the le [...]

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    5. "There is a two-thousand-year-old rumour that the Messiah has come. There is a rumour that God is dead. There is also a rumour than God has resurrected. And there is a rumour that communism will save the world. We live among such a plethora of rumours. The layers of rumours are thick and heavy. It would be sad if we lived by rumours only. This novel is an account of a man who is discontent with rumour and sets out on a journey to find the truth." (Author's preface to the 1st edition) 광장 by [...]

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    6. The Square seemed kind of narrow to me (too much time spent in the private square of the protagonist's thoughts and desires and frustrations and not enough in the public square of people and their actions), but I cannot deny the work is powerful in its way, especially given that it was written only a few years after the Korean War when the author was only 24. BTW the author's age and life during the Korean War and its aftermath would suggest that the that the events of the protagonist's life are [...]

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    7. " with a feeble heart withered like a pickled cabbage in a wrinkled raincoat".This was a hard slog to finish. The frequent flashbacks and flashforwards, unusual imagery and farcical characters made this an awkward reading experience. A disappointing first dip into Korean literature.

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    8. " with a feeble heart withered like a picked cabbage in a wrinkled raincoat".This was a hard slog to finish. The frequent flashbacks and flashforwards, unusual imagery and farcical characters made this an awkward reading experience. A disappointing first dip into Korean literature.

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    9. Parts of this novel are marvelous as the protagonist struggles to find his place in the world, first in capitalist South Korea, then in communist North Korea. But the author spends a lot of time inside his character's head, and those parts can feel tedious.

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    10. First published in 1960, this thought-provoking novel has become a classic of modern Korean literature. It’s the story of Lee Myeong-jun who is torn between the North and the South of his divided homeland. When his father defects to the North, Lee Myeong-jun is arrested and tortured. Disenchanted by the South he too travels north and joins the North Korean Army. When the Korean War breaks out he is captured and sent to a POW camp. At this point he faces a crossroads. He has come to realise he [...]

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    11. Occasionally charming and a decent read as long as you don't mind being awash in angst and anguishing. What can you expect though, it's an existential novel from the 60's. The philosophizing is sophomoric, yet occasionally has it's moments of insight, farce and amusement (such as calling Christianity a sewage system which helps relieve the moral burden of political corruption in society). It has problems with misogyny and portrayal of women, some of which the author appears to be self-aware of a [...]

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    12. I had to read this book for a course on modern Korean literature in a political and sociohistorical context. This book was remarkable to read because it dares to shed light on the effects of the Korean War, which remains a highly charged topic in Korean society, while still remaining objective in its perspective. We often understand the Korean War in the context of the Cold War, with built up military tensions born out of conflicting political ideologies that resulted in proxy wars that served t [...]

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    13. This post first appeared on reading the thingWords are awesome. It’s been a while since I fell in love with words, but I did in the novel “The Square” by Choi In-Hun. The books guarded his naked body and soul much like armor, or a second skin, would.What’s there not to love about this sentence? I tend not to want to underline quotes in a book, but here I kept on wanting get my marker out (and I read on a kindle, so that would’ve been… problematic). the story: young man lives in South [...]

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    14. As far as I'm concerned, given that I live in a country that couldn't be more distant from North and South Korea, North Korea might as well be media created simulacrum of communist menace that serves to scare the people away from questioning the workings of capitalism. With that said, this novel was just mildly interesting as far as literature goes, but rather topical when it comes to the dilemma about the future of (global) society. Neither communism nor capitalistic democracy is good enough at [...]

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    15. Korea is fastly complex is its philosophy, politics, and history and this was an interesting look at a man who was satisfied with neither the north nor the south. Wasn't particularly pleased by his views on women/their treatment but otherwise an introspective look at politics and philosophy.

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    16. I was quite interested in this book's story and protagonist, but its writing is just too disjointed to follow smoothly. I couldn't sustain interest in it, sadly.

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    17. This book should be taught in every uni-level sociology and philosophy course as well as Asian and world lit courses.

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