Milk: The Surprising Story of Milk Through the Ages

  • Title: Milk: The Surprising Story of Milk Through the Ages
  • Author: Anne Mendelson
  • ISBN: 9781400044108
  • Page: 219
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Milk The Surprising Story of Milk Through the Ages Part cookbook with than enticing recipes part culinary history part inquiry into the evolution of an industry Milk is a one of a kind book that will forever change the way we think about dairy p
    Part cookbook with than 120 enticing recipes part culinary history, part inquiry into the evolution of an industry, Milk is a one of a kind book that will forever change the way we think about dairy products.Anne Mendelson, author of Stand Facing the Stove, first explores the earliest Old World homes of yogurt and kindred fermented products made primarily from sheep sPart cookbook with than 120 enticing recipes part culinary history, part inquiry into the evolution of an industry, Milk is a one of a kind book that will forever change the way we think about dairy products.Anne Mendelson, author of Stand Facing the Stove, first explores the earliest Old World homes of yogurt and kindred fermented products made primarily from sheep s and goats milk and soured as a natural consequence of climate Out of this ancient heritage from lands that include Greece, Bosnia, Turkey, Israel, Persia, Afghanistan, and India, she mines a rich source of culinary traditions.Mendelson then takes us on a journey through the lands that traditionally only consumed milk fresh from the cow what she calls the Northwestern Cow Belt northern Europe, Great Britain, North America She shows us how milk reached such prominence in our diet in the nineteenth century that it led to the current practice of overbreeding cows and overprocessing dairy products Her lucid explanation of the chemical intricacies of milk and the simple home experiments she encourages us to try are a revelation of how pure milk products should really taste.The delightfully wide ranging recipes that follow are grouped according to the main dairy ingredient fresh milk and cream, yogurt, cultured milk and cream, butter and true buttermilk, fresh cheeses We learn how to make luscious Clotted Cream, magical Lemon Curd, that beautiful quasi cheese Mascarpone, as well as homemade yogurt, sour cream, true buttermilk, and homemade butter She gives us comfort foods such as Milk Toast and Cream of Tomato Soup alongside Panir and Chhenna from India Here, too, are old favorites like Herring with Sour Cream Sauce, Beef Stroganoff, a New Englandish Clam Chowder, and the elegant Russian Easter dessert, Paskha And there are drinks for every season, from Turkish Ayran and Indian Lassis to Batidos Latin American milkshakes and an authentic hot chocolate.This illuminating book will be an essential part of any food lover s collection and is bound to win converts determined to restore the purity of flavor to our First Food.

    • Best Download [Anne Mendelson] ✓ Milk: The Surprising Story of Milk Through the Ages || [Children's Book] PDF ·
      219 Anne Mendelson
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      Posted by:Anne Mendelson
      Published :2019-07-02T23:37:55+00:00

    About Anne Mendelson


    1. Anne Mendelson Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Milk: The Surprising Story of Milk Through the Ages book, this is one of the most wanted Anne Mendelson author readers around the world.


    145 Comments


    1. I am no foodie. While other kids were dreaming about jet packs and flying cars, my favorite childhood sci-fi fantasy was the invention of a pill that would obviate the need for three meals a day, freeing up my time for less burdensome pursuits. There was a solid year and a half during middle school when I ate the same Stouffer's microwave dinner literally every single night. In fact, I amassed enough proofs of purchase to send away for various prizes through the mail, including a copy of Robert [...]

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    2. That is correct, I have read a 300+ book about milk. I'm now that much more likely to bore my acquaintances with all sorts of fun details about food that I have learned from this book. I AM GREAT AT PARTIES.

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    3. You will never look at the dairy section of the supermarket the same again, but in a good way. I can't help but pick up a container of milk and think of the sheeps and goats grazing near the Tigres-Euphrates River in ancient times that gave us our first dairy products. The first half of the book traces the history of human use of animal milk from the earliest domestication of animals to modern dairy farms. The second half of the book contains recipes that encourage cooks to make choices that go [...]

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    4. An enjoyable history of dairy products from the beginnings of human civilization to now. Meldelson has a three-pronged approach: she examines what humans do with milk, how that's changed over time (and it has changed *drastically*), and the science behind it all. Fascinating, thought it made me more than a little leery of consuming dairy.

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    5. I hate milk. I find many of the recipes in this book frankly loathsome, were I to try them, which I won’t. On the other hand, I like science and history (and ice cream). So despite my stomach churning at some of the recipes and descriptions, I actually enjoyed reading this book.“Milk” begins with history—the history of milk and milk animals around the globe. Americans, of course, focus nearly exclusively on cows and cows’ milk, but Mendelson points out that on a global scale cows are a [...]

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    6. This book is a good read, but I rated it 4 stars instead of 5 because I was hoping it would cover the topic in more depth. The recipes take up a majority of this book, the history part does not which when you consider the subtitle, "The surprising story of milk through the ages," I think you would be surprised too. However, even though the majority of the history/background lesson ends on page 72, she talks more in depth about the various dairy products individually like milk, buttermilk, butter [...]

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    7. I really miss being able to consume dairy products, so I thought it might be fun to read Milk. However, reading it just left a bad taste in my mouth. This has nothing to do with the recipes, which seem well researched and tested with relatively easy-to-follow instructions. The author's food snobbery really got to me after a while, though; surely it would have been sufficient for her to state once, clearly, before every recipe section that she thinks it would be better to use milk that is unhomog [...]

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    8. Part history and part cookbook, Mendelson's work grew out of a lifelong love for milk and fresh dairy products. She would probably enjoy comparing tasting notes with Lucy Knisley (see previous post, French Milk.) I'm a fan of dairy too, even though I never drink milk straight. Instead, give me kefir, yogurt, butter and every kind of cheese One of the best foods I tasted in New Zealand was thick fresh cream that tasted of barnyard - in the best possible way. The butter there is so yellow that it [...]

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    9. I struggled through this book in strange ways. I thought it was all very interesting, but up until maybe midway through the first part of the book (it's divided into a historical narrative section and then recipes), I just could not make myself pick it up (or stay awake while reading it). And then suddenly I was able to get more into it, finished out the first section strongly, and yet petered out again when I got to the recipes section. Since I pretty much never cook, the recipes were going to [...]

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    10. The five stars are for the cover; I'm not going to actually read it. I reserved this after Tamara put it on the front page and I fell in love with the cover. I wanted to see if the lettering was hand-done, a la The Principles of Uncertainty, or if it was a font. It seems to be a font adjusted to different sizes and not lined up on parallel lines -- very interesting. The book didn't say what the font was, so I consulted the internets, and look!! A blog post written by the cover designer! faceoutb [...]

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    11. I love to read both food books and nonfiction, I LOVE dairy, I like to cook and I am a biologist. Basically this book should have combined all my favorite things and yet I can't decide if I really like this book or I really don'tHmmme book is a little dry at the beginning but then it picks up, the tone shifts, she has an agenda (she doesn't like the way we process milk which is why I picked this book up so that is fine with me but others may not like it) but then she seems pretty grumpy about th [...]

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    12. Largely a recipe book, Ms. Mendelson offers a slightly dry take on the history of milk and how we've consumed it as a people, broken out by geographical region. This treatment will be interesting to dairy lovers, probably, but isn't exactly riveting prose aimed at the general consumer. I can't speak to the recipes, as I haven't tried them yet. One high point of the book for me was her totally rational, utterly reasonable take on the raw vs. pasteurized milk debate--a debate, as far as I can tell [...]

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    13. The first half of the book comprises a kind of biography of milk, examining its use and variety around the globe and across time. The idea of this is interesting to me, but I found myself slipping away from the text. Finally, I gave up and skipped to the second half, which breaks down into chapters on yogurt, cheese, buttermilk, etc. Each section allows a brief background followed by a bunch of recipes. I've only tried a few of the recipes so far, but I like what I've done. The mango lassi, espe [...]

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    14. Thus far I am loving this book. Mendelson looks at the history of milk using taste as her rule. She does look critically at the modern dairy industry, but rather than bemoan the decrease in the health benefits of milk, the poor treatment of dairy cattle, or the corporate nature of the dairy industry, she talks more about the loss of richness & flavor in our modern versions of an ancient food source. The recipes are an added benefit as you learn about a dairy product and can then go and try t [...]

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    15. Really interesting, especially the parts about milk animals, non-homogenized milk, and the first three chapters of recipes (fresh milk, yogurt, and cultured milk). Hearing Anne Mendelson speak was what originally convinced my partner to buy local non-homogenized milk and not worry whether it was organic (as she points out, a lot of organic milk is pasteurized at high temperatures and shipped for long times/distances to get to you). Her writing could be more concise and her horror at processed an [...]

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    16. Quirky and opinionated overview of the history of milk in Europe, western Asian and North America & a love song to proper yogurt. It's misleadingly packaged, as it looks like a food history and is really a cookbook with a long introduction. She's quite funny, you can't miss her opinion of modern Western Milk and the recipe section is fascinating and brilliant. If you're interesting in food at all, I think its well worth it, though the overview may be basic for those who are already aware of [...]

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    17. I am a mostly-vegan so I didn't try any of the recipes, but I really loved the first sections about the History of milk. I went into the book expecting to have to wade through a lot of pro-dairy industry / anti-vegan stuff to get to the history, but I was pleasantly surprised! Mendelson, a passionate dairy lover, did a fantastic job of presenting the facts about human consumption of non-human milk through the ages, including the dark side. I am currently on a history-of-various-food-staples read [...]

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    18. I really enjoyed this book. I took it out of the library several times over the last year and recently I finally decided to buy it. I honestly don't understand why people dislike the book or think the author is a food snob. I found the history interesting and the recipes all sound appealing. My husband has a hard time with milk, so we regularly make kefir, yogurt and feta cheese instead. I can't give up milk in my coffee, but we've begun to see what other forms we can try.

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    19. I find it hard to believe that a book about one thing (milk) could lack focus, but this did. It was hard to dredge through. I think I was expecting more of a look at how we have gotten to the industrialized white water we now all drink, instead I got a few pages of that, and hundreds of pages focusing on how cool milk is. I agree, milk is cool, isn't that why I picked up the book in the first place?

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    20. An excellent read. I had to put it down several times because I had to get other things read ahead of it and it was easy to pick up each time. This may be that each chapter covers slightly different aspects of milk like sweet milk, then sour milk or buttermilk and of course creams. Not to mention yogurts, cheeses and in-betweens like curds, cottage cheese and whey like creations. Truly a fascinating, informative journey and then the recipes are awesome too!

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    21. Sweet milk doesn't do a body good!!!! The rise of super dairies, lactose intolerance and the Milk industry pushing Bovine milk on us like it's the secret to health. Many things are good in moderation. My own daughter cannot drink sweet milk. A good history of dairy farming and milk especially with the advance of modern refrigeration. Obviously our pre-industrial age ancestors enjoyed milk in other ways (i.e. yogurts). A very interesting book.

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    22. Anne Mendelson explores the history of milk starting with the prehistoric origins of goat and sheep domestication and ending with modern large scale dairies. I found her writing entertaining and wished the history section was longer. I was glad that she didn't just gloss over the science, but really delved into the particulars. The book also contains a number of recipes for milk products and dishes from around the world.

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    23. Very interesting! I enjoyed reading about milk around the world and its history as human food. Although the author is quite elitist in her views of what kinds of milk are worth drinking, I still learned a lot from the book. There are plenty of great fundamental recipes to try too, many of international origin, such as various cheeses, yogurts, butter, etc.

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    24. I am continually shocked at how simple products get complicated as they are processed into the industrial food appearing in the grocery store. This book did a really nice job of explaining the history of milk consumption and some of the geographical and cultural differences. I also learned exactly why my attempts at yogurt failed in the past.

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    25. She's no Simon Winchester (the god of microhistory) but this is a solid book with valuable information. The recipe part could have been a lot smaller (and the descriptions sometimes get a little creepy when she waxes ecstatic over some mouth feel of a questionable product) but I still learned a lot.

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    26. I think the target audience for this book is probably someone who is a better cook than I am. this work is a bit about 1/4 social history, 1/2 recipe book, and 1/4 trying to convince you that old fashioned soured milk is betternce I was hoping for more of a straightforward social history, like similar works on salt, cod, and rum, it was less to my taste.

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    27. I thought this book was going to be really interesting, but I didn't get too far into when i realized it's more information than I ever cared to know about milk related things. For example, I'm not interested in knowing what the latin names are for the different types of animals that we get milk from. The cover of the book looks cool.

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    28. fascinating! half history/cultural anthropology about humans' relationships with milk animals around the world and over thousands of years. second half is recipes. inspired me to finally make my first batch of yogurt.

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    29. I am interested to read what this author has to say about dairy production, seeing as how she is a culinary writer, not a dairy scientist. I have a feeling it will be pushing an agenda, much like Bon Appetit has been lately, forcing me to cancel my subscription.

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    30. Good. Very opinionated author. She makes me want to track down un-homogenized milk. But her detailed recipes are not for my current phase of life. I would read more by this author though as she is a very thorough researcher. Print.

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