Harlequin Valentine

  • Title: Harlequin Valentine
  • Author: Neil Gaiman John Bolton
  • ISBN: 9781840234114
  • Page: 244
  • Format: None
  • Harlequin Valentine In this modern retelling of a classic commedia dell arte legend of tomfoolery and hopeless fawning love creators Neil Gaiman Sandman and John Bolton Manbat Batman update the relation of Harlequin an
    In this modern retelling of a classic commedia dell arte legend of tomfoolery and hopeless, fawning love, creators Neil Gaiman Sandman and John Bolton Manbat Batman update the relation of Harlequin and Columbine A buffoon burdened with a brimming heart, Harlequin chases his sensible, oblivious Columbine around the streets of a city, having given his heart freely CoIn this modern retelling of a classic commedia dell arte legend of tomfoolery and hopeless, fawning love, creators Neil Gaiman Sandman and John Bolton Manbat Batman update the relation of Harlequin and Columbine A buffoon burdened with a brimming heart, Harlequin chases his sensible, oblivious Columbine around the streets of a city, having given his heart freely Consumed with love, the impulsive clown sees his heart dragged about town, with a charming surprise to bend the tale in a modern direction Gaiman s writing is poetic and as loopy as the subject matter Bolton s art, a combination of digitally enhanced photo realism and dynamic painting provides sensational depth with bright characters over fittingly muted backgrounds Those who have spent Valentine s Day alone know that the cold February holiday can be hard to swallow Gaiman and Bolton want you to know that all it takes is a steak knife, a fork, and a bottle of quality ketchup.Contains an additional 8 page backup feature written by Neil Gaiman and illustrated by John Bolton on the history of commedia dell arte

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      Posted by:Neil Gaiman John Bolton
      Published :2019-07-27T23:38:27+00:00

    About Neil Gaiman John Bolton


    1. Neil Gaiman John Bolton Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Harlequin Valentine book, this is one of the most wanted Neil Gaiman John Bolton author readers around the world.


    793 Comments


    1. The Neil Gaiman's Telling Tales book series by John Bolton and Neil Gaiman begins with “Harlequin Valentine.” I am not sure of the exact purpose of this series, but Harlequin is a version of a story also published by Gaiman in Fragile Things (1999). It was first published as a graphic novel in 2001, illustrated by the very talented John Bolton, and is reprinted here as a way of kicking off this series, such as it is.The story is based on an old Commedia dell'arte and Harlequinade pantomime, [...]

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    2. Interesting story. I didn't know much about Harlequin before I read this graphic novel. However, the graphic was a bit so-so. Can't say I did like the art very much and if the story had not been so engaging would I probably have given Harlequin Valentine a lower rating.

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    3. The art is good but there's not much story here. It's a retelling of an old story I'd never heard of. Meh.

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    4. 4 starsWasn't familiar with the Harlequin mythos (which gained widespread popularity in the 17th century), but I'm glad Gaiman took his anecdote to the graphic novel medium. Written with an old style prose, it's classic Gaiman with a classic yet different twist on this centuries old character. Recommended to Gaiman fans that also enjoy graphic novels. And the art, by Bolton, is fantastic. 4 stars

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    5. Would you give your heart to someone for Valentines’ Day—literally? Neil Gaiman’s buffoonish Harlequin certainly will. In this romantically twisted re-imagining of Comedia dell’Arte and the British Pantomime, Gaiman once again proved that he is a wizard of storytelling. Couple that with John Bolton’s adroit hands with a palette of colors and what you get is a little literary treasure that will leave a lingering feeling in you after you turn the last page.Harlequin Valentine follows the [...]

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    6. What a great holiday of hearts this is when a demented Harlequin clown literally rips his heart out and pins it to the door of the one he wants as his columbine as a proclamation of love. Will his plan to ensnare Missy with his grotesque gift succeed or will there be something else in store for him? Read on and find out for yourself.I thought this was a pretty good read. Neil Gaiman brings us a wonderfully twisted Valentine's day tale about the Harlequin clown and his antics. The artwork by the [...]

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    7. Not bad just not for me.extremely short. You could read this in one sitting although the font is very tiny for the few pages this is. The artwork is the best thing about this.

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    8. This was just not my cup of tea. Gaiman is always hit or miss with me and this is a miss. I'm not familiar with the culture and history of the theatre form being retold here in a modern retelling. I know what harlequins and pierrots are but didn't have the background to "get" this tale and with that said it was just simply a little strange and a lot boring. The art is good, which I'll always say about Gaiman's graphic novels and picture books; he is paired with some fantastic illustrators. The a [...]

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    9. This comic came at an ironic time for me, that is to say, two stories before I would've read its original story in Fragile Things. At the tail-end of my Neil Gaiman binge, I was alternating between some of his comics, and the short stories in the aforementioned collection. I was unaware that Gaiman had transformed more than a few of his short stories into graphic novels. It was interesting reading the graphic novel first. Insofar as I can tell, there are no changes between the short story and th [...]

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    10. One of Gaiman's earliest works and it shows. It's an entertaining tale that brings back the delights of 'Comedia dell'Arte' to modern times, but even if it feels as a chapter of 'The Sandman' somehow it lacks its strength. Still, an entertaining read!

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    11. Prosaic writing, a lifeless story, a shoddy execution, and very unpleasant artwork make Neil Gaiman's "Harlequin Valentine" a forgettable book that you will be glad is only 32 pages.

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    12. What a weird little book. Pleasant but short. Different and odd. The artwork was unusual as well. It is Valentine's Day and Harlequin has his sites set on Missy. What better way to woo a girl then to tack your heart on their door! It just get stranger after that but that is okay, I like strange. The biggest issue I had with the book though was the print. It was so small that I had a really hard time making out the words. Other than that, it was a quick and enjoyable read.

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    13. 4.5/5This took me a little while to get in to, and I'll be honest I didn't love the art--just didn't seem to fit the story for me, and that kept bringing me out of it. That said, the story did finally completely capture my attention, and then I loved it--and I loved the ending.

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    14. Valentine is a time for lovers, yet set in the one of the coldest months of the year in many climes. How is happiness and romance supposed to bloom in a time when no one is in the mood to take off their clothes? A certain Harlequin has no concern for that, only his oblivious Columbine, whose feelings of love may not be the same as his… Gaiman gives us a tale of surprises, changes and trickery where nothing is as it seems and love itself can be taken off balance. In muted, colored backgrounds, [...]

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    15. This is classic Gaiman: a story that twists and bends and gives you exactly what you want while still surprising you with the fact that you wanted it. The story was recently released as part of Gaiman'sFragile Things collection, but (biased as I may be from having read this version first) I find that the art really adds to it.

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    16. I realized after I had steeped it that I had chosen St. Valentine tea (the box is decorated with the portrait not of Saint Valentine but of Czar Nicholas). Power of suggestion! Box a lighter, gentler red than the darkly bleeding hearts of this story: cut from breasts, nailed to doors, shown to strangers, devoured. Not bad things! There's nothing either good or bad but thinking makes it so. But these tricks are not for kids

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    17. a wondefully twisted little love story The artwork is stunning, and the text and pictures complement each other perfectly.

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    18. A weak short story about Harlequin in love.A twisted "love" story that didn't appeal to me.

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    19. Once upon a time, I wanted to own everything that Gaiman wrote. Then I realized that I would like to spend money on other artists. And like, food. So library it was! And I'm so happy. Because this is not something I would have been happy to buy. The story is just. boring. Just meh.I'm neither better nor worse off than I was before I read this. But I guess not everything one writes can be good.

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    20. I had read the story before and find it up to Gaiman's usual standard, mixing dreamy myth and realistic grit.The art is functional, but I feel it is a bit too photo-realistic to be as expressive as the Harlequin narrator calls for. My biggest complaint is that the font the letterer chose is rendered too small for easy reading. A plainer font may have been fine at that size, but not the more calligraphic style used.

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    21. El celebrado autor toma a uno de los personajes clásicos en la Commedia dell'Arte para darle su acostumbrado giro moderno. Una historia bien contada donde tampoco faltan sus recurrentes personajes femeninos fuertes, pero que a esta altura no ofrece ninguna sorpresa.

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    22. Neil Gaiman has always had a talent for mixing his wordplay in such a way that the reader feels at home in whatever world he has decided to create. This particular graphic novel/comic is no exception, however Gaiman appears to have a problem with finding artists who can match his tone, and although I think this particular artist does a better job than many, I still felt taken out of the world a little bit by the artwork.This could be blamed on me being someone who usually reads novels, not comic [...]

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    23. ARC REVIEW Harlequin finds his Colombine and on Valentines he gives her his heart, literally. But in a typical twisted way Neil Gaiman takes the Commedia dell'Arte to a whole new level. In the story the invisible Harlequin follows his Colombine around the city which leads to an unexpected twist for our clown and his love. I learned about Commedia dell'Arte in High School theatre and was glad to see a modern twist to the story especially by Gaiman. The art was fantastic, stunning really. My only [...]

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    24. A thoroughly engaging short graphic novel, it is visually and dramatically compelling. The story for me was held together by the sense that the relationships between these characters, even those briefly glimpsed, were natural and very real. The protagonist of the Harlequin is seemingly trapped between his nature and his desire, his interest trapped between experience and a belief in what cannot be seen, and the other characters seemingly trapped by their roles and jobs on a cold Valentine's Day. [...]

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    25. Harlequin Valentine is such a delightful cocktail of quirkiness, oddity and romaticism that one cannot help but love it. I have always enjoyed pantomimes and the harlequinades (which I've only seen on film and in classib British tv series) and this is a charming re-telling of the old tale of the Harlequin and Columbine in the best Commedia dell'Arte tradition. At first, I wasn't sure if I liked Bolton's illustrations, as beautiful and eerie as they are since they looked so much like eighties' fa [...]

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    26. Harlequin Valentine is a bloody and romantic short story later rewritten into a graphic novel by Neil Gaiman & illustrated by John Bolton, based on the old Commedia dell'arte and Harlequinade pantomime. The short story has been republished in Gaiman's collection of short stories in "Fragile Things."The story takes place on February 14 with the Harlequin giving Missy his heart, literally speaking, by nailing it to her door. The story follows the Missy as she tries to discover who gave her thi [...]

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    27. Tale of a mischievous, invisible harlequin who attempts to romance a lonely girl on St. Valentine's Day. The harlequin literally gives his heart to the girl, nailing the bloody thing to her front door and then sort of following her around, waiting for her to notice him.The story is short and offbeat enough that you continue reading, but it never really grounds you with a specific tone, and fails to convey any lasting emotion other than one of strangeness. Not because of its supernatural trickste [...]

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