The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories

  • Title: The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories
  • Author: Angela Carter
  • ISBN: 9780140178210
  • Page: 286
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories Angela Carter was a storytelling sorceress the literary godmother of such contemporary masters of supernatural fiction as Neil Gaiman David Mitchell Audrey Niffenegger J K Rowling and Kelly Link
    Angela Carter was a storytelling sorceress, the literary godmother of such contemporary masters of supernatural fiction as Neil Gaiman, David Mitchell, Audrey Niffenegger, J K Rowling, and Kelly Link, who introduces this edition of Carter s most celebrated book, published for the seventy fifth anniversary of her birth In The Bloody Chamber which includes the story thatAngela Carter was a storytelling sorceress, the literary godmother of such contemporary masters of supernatural fiction as Neil Gaiman, David Mitchell, Audrey Niffenegger, J K Rowling, and Kelly Link, who introduces this edition of Carter s most celebrated book, published for the seventy fifth anniversary of her birth In The Bloody Chamber which includes the story that is the basis of Neil Jordan s 1984 movie The Company of Wolves Carter spins subversively dark and sensual versions of familiar fairy tales and legends like Little Red Riding Hood, Bluebeard, Puss in Boots, and Beauty and the Beast, giving them exhilarating new life in a style steeped in the romantic trappings of the gothic tradition.

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      286 Angela Carter
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      Posted by:Angela Carter
      Published :2019-09-01T07:12:08+00:00

    About Angela Carter


    1. Born Angela Olive Stalker in Eastbourne, in 1940, Carter was evacuated as a child to live in Yorkshire with her maternal grandmother As a teenager she battled anorexia She began work as a journalist on the Croydon Advertiser, following in the footsteps of her father Carter attended the University of Bristol where she studied English literature.She married twice, first in 1960 to Paul Carter They divorced after twelve years In 1969 Angela Carter used the proceeds of her Somerset Maugham Award to leave her husband and relocate for two years to Tokyo, Japan, where she claims in Nothing Sacred 1982 that she learnt what it is to be a woman and became radicalised She wrote about her experiences there in articles for New Society and a collection of short stories, Fireworks Nine Profane Pieces 1974 , and evidence of her experiences in Japan can also be seen in The Infernal Desire Machines of Doctor Hoffman 1972 She was there at the same time as Roland Barthes, who published his experiences in Empire of Signs 1970.She then explored the United States, Asia, and Europe, helped by her fluency in French and German She spent much of the late 1970s and 1980s as a writer in residence at universities, including the University of Sheffield, Brown University, the University of Adelaide, and the University of East Anglia In 1977 Carter married Mark Pearce, with whom she had one son.As well as being a prolific writer of fiction, Carter contributed many articles to The Guardian, The Independent and New Statesman, collected in Shaking a Leg She adapted a number of her short stories for radio and wrote two original radio dramas on Richard Dadd and Ronald Firbank Two of her fictions have been adapted for the silver screen The Company of Wolves 1984 and The Magic Toyshop 1987 She was actively involved in both film adaptations, her screenplays are published in the collected dramatic writings, The Curious Room, together with her radio scripts, a libretto for an opera of Virginia Wolf s Orlando, an unproduced screenplay entitled The Christchurch Murders based on the same true story as Peter Jackson s Heavenly Creatures and other works These neglected works, as well as her controversial television documentary, The Holy Family Album, are discussed in Charlotte Crofts book, Anagrams of Desire 2003.At the time of her death, Carter was embarking on a sequel to Charlotte Bront s Jane Eyre based on the later life of Jane s stepdaughter, Ad le Varens However, only a synopsis survives.Her novel Nights at the Circus won the 1984 James Tait Black Memorial Prize for literature.Angela Carter died aged 51 in 1992 at her home in London after developing lung cancer Her obituary published in The Observer said, She was the opposite of parochial Nothing, for her, was outside the pale she wanted to know about everything and everyone, and every place and every word She relished life and language hugely, and reveled in the diverse.


    174 Comments


    1. Angela Carter reveals the dark heart of the fairy story in these memorably quirky versions. She is able to intensify the mythic core of each of these tales, not by stripping them down to their essentials (the obvious way) but by using eccentric, illuminative detail expressed in individualistic prose. Although these versions could be described as feminist and anti-patriarchal, such labels are too limiting for the fierce independence of Carter's intelligence. She is a writer who never shrinks from [...]

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    2. Halloween re-read!Angela Carter is an absolute masterful writer. She takes the basic narrative of fairy tales and infuses them will blood, death and horror. She’s a genius at what she does.She’s a great story-teller. She transports the stories to the confines of modern society and considers real issues such as the representation of women, the limitations of gender and the restrictions of stories themselves.Her prose is captivating, near on enchanting. As soon as I began reading the first sto [...]

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    3. Hey there Little Red Riding Hood,You sure are looking good.You’re everything a big bad wolf could want.Listen to me…I don’t think little big girls shouldGo walking in these spooky old woods alone. —Sam the Sham and the Pharaohs, 1962In The Bloody Chamber, Angela Carter’s uses a decidedly feminist slant to re-tell familiar myths and stories. “The Company of Wolves,” for example, provides a point-by-point rebuttal of the myths embedded in the more modern versions of “Little Red Rid [...]

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    4. An extraordinarily sensual, symbol-rich, collection of very adult tales of enchantment, focusing on female protagonists. Some are dirtier versions of the familiar, some are barely recognisable beyond title and names, and a couple were unknown to me. The Lyon and Tiger stories are variants of each other, and it ends with three relating to wolves, two of which are versions of Little Red Riding Hood.There is blood in the title, and there are many allusions to literal and metaphorical blood (mainly [...]

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    5. Τα πιο γνωστά μας παραμύθια,οι μύθοι που έχουν ταξιδέψει απο γενιά σε γενιά, οι θρύλοι και οι λαϊκές παραδόσεις ζωντανεύουν μέσα σε αυτό το βιβλίο με τη μορφή παρωδίας και σεξιστικής λαϊκής κουλτούρας. Όλες οι ιστορίες των παιδικών μας χρόνων -σωστά ισχυρίζεται η συγγραφέα [...]

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    6. What an excellent bundle of stories bringing it all back home, fairytales-and-folklore-wise, stripped of their deceptive pop-culture whitewash, all blood-splattered and primal and sensual and lady-teachy. I don't know which rose pricked me deeper; the blood countess stricken with sudden, self-sacrificial hideousness in the eternal sleep of light-of-day at finding a pure, deserving specimen of love, "dropped off to sleep over the cards of destiny that are so fingered, so soiled, so worn by consta [...]

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    7. SpoilersI had high expectations for this, Carter's fairy tale retellings are meant to be well known for being feminist, gothic, and original. For the most part, I didn't feel that was true. Having a few heroines with sexual agency didn't magically make them feminist or ground breaking, it takes a lot more than that to modernise a fairy tale. There were only a couple of them that I actually found somewhat enjoyable, the rest were rubbish.Hated the writing, it was convoluted, complicated, and nons [...]

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    8. After the rigorous pounding that I got while reading The Infernal Desire Machines of Dr Hoffman, I certainly wasn't expecting this almost diffident collection of short stories.Reading the whole collection the sense of Carter's craft is very strong - emphasised by having stories like The Courtship of Mr Lyon and The Tiger's Bride which are variants of the same folktale, or the repetition of the same elements - such as the magical power of virginity in The Lady of the House of Love and The Company [...]

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    9. There's the indulgence of the mind, and there's the pleasure of the senses. One can fill oneself up on the former to the brim, hold firmly to one's breast its lack of ignorance, its sophisticated patterns of thought, its know-how translating into a delightful net of endless know-whens and know-whats and whatever know-wherefore's your precious neurons may desire. There's a unique satisfaction to be had in those sorts of theoretical acrobatics, that complex weave of states of mind that are fully a [...]

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    10. The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories are indeed heaven for psychoanalysts, as they contain a lot of mythical symbols of subconscious conflicts and are dealing with Eros and Thantos that are, according to Freud, two most powerful driving forces for humans, and in Carter's imaginative world of fairy tales characters are driven by pursue for (sometimes sadistic, more-often sexual) pleasure. Angela Carter made clear, "My intention was not to do 'versions' or, as the American edition of the book said [...]

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    11. Bloody fantastic pick for a Halloween read!It's not like we celebrate Halloween in my part of the world, but I am content to make it a custom every year to read something outside of my usual haunts. October is as good a pretext as any when it comes to horror, the younger sibling of fantasy and science-fiction in speculative fiction, at least for me. Angela Carter can be relied upon to transform scary entertainment into an art form, to twist a familiar fairytale into something more substantial, m [...]

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    12. Read a book of short stories. --------------------Well, I'm in a bit of a fairy-tale re-imagining place latelyis one is getting bumped up on the pile.Buddy read with two of my favorite ladies, Heather and Karly for July 1.---------------------So when I totalled up all my stars for each story and divided them by the number of stories, this book fell onto 2.7 stars. I guess I will round this bitch up star-wise, but it's still only a 2.5 star read for me. What a disappointment. I'm never completely [...]

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    13. "The Marquis stood transfixed, utterly dazed, at a loss. It must have been as if he had been watching his beloved Tristan for the twelfth, thirteenth time and Tristan stirred, then leapt from his bier in the last act, announce in a januty aria interposed from Verdi that bygones were bygones, crying over spilt milk did nobody any good and, as for himself, he proposed to live happily ever after. The puppet master, open mouthed, wide eyed, impotent at the last, saw his dolls break free of their str [...]

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    14. Category: A book of short stories.The Bloody Chamber3.5 StarsI am by no means familiar with the story of Bluebeard, so I have no idea how far Carter may have deviated from the traditional story with this short story retelling HOWEVER I found myself getting lost in her lush, descriptive prose within this one. Her language choices may, overall, become a downfall but for this story it was both fitting and quotable. I do wish I had gotten a bit more of a story here, I would love to have read more ab [...]

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    15. 3.5/5 stars! Dark, sensual and definitely adult fairytale retellings. Some stories were a bit to cryptic and symbolic for my liking, but there were also some real gems in this collection. My favourite short stories were 'The Bloody Chamber', 'The Erl-King' and 'The Werewolf'. (view spoiler)[Why is Angela Carter so obsessed with the word 'nipple'? :D Hahaha, this honestly annoyed me after a while. The word appeared in literally every story. (hide spoiler)]

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    16. The wolfsong is the sound of the rending you will suffer, in itself a murdering.As a rule I don't care for folklore. I also maintain a historical aversion to short stories. What a joy it is then to proclaim my love for these macabre tales of hymens, fogged mirrors, and the gasps of lusts and bloodletting. Ms. Carter's tales are fevered variations on nursery rhymes: Bluebeard, Red Riding Hood Lycanthropes and wee wicked Alice dart from the shadows and dazzle the reader.

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    17. I was expecting to be made very uncomfortable by Carter's best known work, but FAR from being a pornographic wallowing in sex and violence, I found the book to be a feast for my creative understanding. Gender and power relationships & structures, fantasy and folklore are explored from a critical feminist perspective in a series of tales that excavate, question and challenge the 'latent content' of traditional fairy tales, often by shifting and switching gender and power roles.Some of these s [...]

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    18. Angela Carter wrote stories in a lope and growl that tugs my senses with familiarity, and the edition I read had the small, almost-blurry font that reminded me of the old fairy-tale books I used to check out over and over again as a child. But these aren't the fairy tales I remember. All the coded sexuality and perversities are less shaded, filling a void I hadn't realized was present (twss).This depressed me, too. I'd popped in the BBC's Hamlet with David Tennant and Patrick Stewart (thanks, Bi [...]

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    19. As I read the reviews of this book, I came to the following conclusion - in popular YA books, girls aren't going after Prince Charming, but Bluebeard, and there was no better example for this than "The Bloody Chamber", the first story in this anthology.Think about it - a man, with several complexes, probably impotent or in possession of some weird blood fetish, purposedly chooses a wife that is both curious and insecure. He presents her with a key, telling her not to go into the room, fully know [...]

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    20. I can still remember when I got this book. It was a Christmas present. I asked for it because Terri Windling and Ellen Datlow had mentioned it. I can't remember if it was in one of Year's Best series, which I proudly own every copy of, or one of their fairy tale books. I remember unwrapping the book, and my mother asking if I was sure I wanted it because it was in the "woman's section" of the bookstore. I didn't, and still don't, understand why that would be a bad thing. I read it that night.I l [...]

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    21. We've all grown up enough to know that what Disney shows us of fairy tales is so far removed from the "real" stories from way back in the day. The "real" stories are really bloody and pretty gross and totally traumatizing for most wussy children of today to read. It would scare the tuna out of them.Angela Carter's retellings/reimaginings/rewhateverings are more like the original stories, except with a really refreshing feminist slant because the women in these stories have actual voices which is [...]

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    22. This book just didn't do it for me and I can say with 100% certainty that I did not like it because of Angela Carter's writing style. I love fairytale retellings but the writing made this book hard to enjoy. The stories themselves weren't actually that bad and I can see why people would like this book but I couldn't like them or get fully into them because of the writing. The writing was insufferable. Carter writes insanely long sentences with tonnes of punctuation and it is the stuff of nightma [...]

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    23. It is a northern country; they have cold weather, they have cold hearts. Cold; tempest; wild beasts in the forest. It is a hard life. The Bloody Chamber is a collection of fairytale retellings that somehow manages to capture the strange wonder that fairytales held for me as a child while imbuing them with a darker sensuality.The writing is incredibly beautiful. I can't even describe it, you just have to read it:You are always in danger in the forest, where no people are. Step between the portals [...]

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    24. I would never encourage anyone else to write like Angela Carter, because in almost any other hands it would be disastrous. But she somehow creates this feast of linguistic decadence that’s sensual, dark, dreamy, and sometimes laugh-out-loud funny. This short story collection was 160 pages of Carter seducing the English language, and the English language fell HARD. The 10 stories mostly feature fairytale retellings that are as haunting and atmospheric as they are analytical. Carter asks questio [...]

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    25. Your green eye is a reducing chamber. If I look into it long enough, I will become as small as my own reflection, I will diminish to a point and vanish. I will be drawn down into that black whirlpool and be consumed by you. I shall become so small you can keep me in one of your osier cages and mock my loss of liberty. I have seen the cage you are weaving for me; it is a very pretty one and I shall sit, hereafter, in my cage among the other singing birds but I – I shall be dumb, from spite.“T [...]

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    26. Me ha fascinado cómo escribe Angela Carter y la imaginación que tiene, a veces retorcida y otras terroríficamente sensual, para darle la vuelta a cuentos que casi todos conocemos. Como cualquier recopilación de relatos, tiene algunos que me encantaron y otros que no tanto, pero me parece una muy buena selección para poder conocer a la autora. Un plus sin duda es que la lectura se disfruta el doble con esta preciosa edición de Sexto Piso ilustrada por Alejandra Acosta: una auténtica maravi [...]

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    27. The Bloody Chamber is a collection of short story fiction that challenges the concept of the supernatural themes of fairytales as much as it challenges the ideologies and values of its era. And, for that matter, into the modern age. Angela Carter has a prose voice which is similar to that of modern authors such as Neil Gaiman or even perhaps Susanna Clarke and yet is remarkably her own. It is a voice which relies upon the sensual and superficial as much as it relies upon the transient and metaph [...]

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    28. On account of this book's reputation for containing "fairy tales for adults," a reputation that Carter herself hated, I avoided this book for a while. I should've known there was more to it than that, seeing as it was recommended to me by a well-read creative writing professor and not a Hot Topic teenager, but "fairy tales for adults" just conjures bad images into my mind. Some grotesque Tim Burton-meets-Todd MacFarlane-type abomination, the usual "Jack HAS SEX WITH THE GIANT'S WIFE and when thi [...]

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    29. This is one of the most beautifully written books I have ever read. Angela Carter would have made my first sentence and exquisite masterpiece.She writes things like " The lucidity,the clarity of the light that afternoon was sufficient to itself; " or this "For now my own skin was my sole capitol in the world and today I'd make my first investment.", and then this ""Step between the portals of the great pines where shaggy branches tangle about you,trapping the unwary traveler in nets as if the ve [...]

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    30. Buddy read with my amazing ladies Jess and Karly starting June 1st July 1st!REVIEWThe first time I read this, I didn't like it as much as I had hoped. But I thought it was just me, unable to appreciate subtlety or symbolism or something. I picked out "The Erl-King" as my favorite story, mainly because I thought I should like at least one of them.Now I've read it a second time, and I still didn't like it much. Three things piss me off about Carter's writing:1) her tendency to stick semi-colons in [...]

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