Say Everything: How Blogging Began, What It's Becoming, and Why It Matters

  • Title: Say Everything: How Blogging Began, What It's Becoming, and Why It Matters
  • Author: Scott Rosenberg
  • ISBN: 9780307451361
  • Page: 325
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Say Everything How Blogging Began What It s Becoming and Why It Matters Blogs are everywhere They have exposed truths and spread rumors Made and lost fortunes Brought couples together and torn them apart Toppled cabinet members and sparked grassroots movements Immediate
    Blogs are everywhere They have exposed truths and spread rumors Made and lost fortunes Brought couples together and torn them apart Toppled cabinet members and sparked grassroots movements Immediate, intimate, and influential, they have put the power of personal publishing into everyone s hands Regularly dismissed as trivial and ephemeral, they have proved that theyBlogs are everywhere They have exposed truths and spread rumors Made and lost fortunes Brought couples together and torn them apart Toppled cabinet members and sparked grassroots movements Immediate, intimate, and influential, they have put the power of personal publishing into everyone s hands Regularly dismissed as trivial and ephemeral, they have proved that they are here to stay.In Say Everything, Scott Rosenberg chronicles blogging s unplanned rise and improbable triumph, tracing its impact on politics, business, the media, and our personal lives He offers close ups of innovators such as Blogger founder Evan Williams, investigative journalist Josh Marshall, exhibitionist diarist Justin Hall, software visionary Dave Winer, mommyblogger Heather Armstrong, and many others These blogging pioneers were the first to face new dilemmas that have become common in the era of Google and Facebook, and their stories offer vital insights and warnings as we navigate the future How much of our lives should we reveal on the Web Is anonymity a boon or a curse Which voices can we trust What does authenticity look like on a stage where millions are fighting for attention, yet most only write for a handful And what happens to our culture now that everyone can say everything Before blogs, it was easy to believe that the Web would grow up to be a clickable TV slick, passive, mass market Instead, blogging brought the Web s native character into focus convivial, expressive, democratic Far from being pajama clad loners, bloggers have become the curators of our collective experience, testing out their ideas in front of a crowd and linking people in ways that broadcasts can t match Blogs have created a new kind of public sphere one in which we can think out loud together And now that we have begun, Rosenberg writes, it is impossible to imagine us stopping.In his first book, Dreaming in Code, Scott Rosenberg brilliantly explored the art of creating software the first true successor to The Soul of a New Machine, wrote James Fallows in The Atlantic In Say Everything, Rosenberg brings the same perceptive eye to the blogosphere, capturing as no one else has the birth of a new medium.

    • Free Read [Biography Book] ☆ Say Everything: How Blogging Began, What It's Becoming, and Why It Matters - by Scott Rosenberg ✓
      325 Scott Rosenberg
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Biography Book] ☆ Say Everything: How Blogging Began, What It's Becoming, and Why It Matters - by Scott Rosenberg ✓
      Posted by:Scott Rosenberg
      Published :2019-07-27T23:57:57+00:00

    About Scott Rosenberg


    1. Writer, editor and website builder SCOTT ROSENBERG is a cofounder of Salon and author of Say Everything How Blogging Began, What It s Becoming and Why It Matters and Dreaming in Code Two Dozen Programmers, Three Years, 4,732 Bugs, and One Quest For Transcendent Software.Librarian Note There is than one author in the GoodReads database with this name See this thread for information.At Salon, Scott served as technology editor and, from 1999 to 2004, as managing editor and vice president for editorial operations He also started the Salon Blogs program in 2002 and began his own blog as part of it Before leaving Salon in 2007 to write SAY EVERYTHING he conceived and prototyped the Open Salon blogging community.Before Salon he wrote on theater, movies, and technology for the San Francisco Examiner for a decade and was honored with the George Jean Nathan Award for his reviews His writing has appeared in the New York Times, Wired, and many other publications He lives in Berkeley, California, with his wife and two sons.


    625 Comments


    1. Really well-reasearched and artfully presented history of blogging. Scott is very sensitive and perceptive, and doesn't merely hash over tired controversies, but brings sharp insight to the blogging saga.

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    2. Found this at work yesterday, picked it up to flip through, and haven't been able to put it down since. I'm dipping in and out of chapters (unwittingly playing the role of Carr's Flickering Man?), but from the three or so chapters I have read in their entirety, I can say that it's a really intelligent, engaging, and in-depth look at the genesis, progression, and subsequent explosion of blogging over the past decade. I plan to go back and read the whole thing from page one.(Having finished it, I [...]

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    3. Salon cofounder Rosenberg explores the history and consequences of blogging. He does a good job portraying the technical and business evolution of blogs, and just an okay job analyzing their literary development. But what I really like is his discussion of the social effects of blogging, and how the blog is affecting our creativity.A couple of lines I particularly liked:"people have consistently overestimated the Web's similarities to television and underestimated its kinship to the telephone."a [...]

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    4. Fascinating reading. Unusually detailed look at the past 15 years of the Internet related to the concept of blogs. Lots of personalities. I was not not so pulled in by the exquisite detail about lineage of " important" bloggers. The chapter entitled "The Perils of Keeping It Real" was the best. That chapter opened my eyes to the perils of putting yourself out there, and how the cloak of anonymity allows alter egos to emerge and rip apart often honest efforts to communicate. The book slammed home [...]

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    5. Say Everything: How Blogging Began, What It's Becoming, and Why It Matters Paperback by Scott Rosenberg Say Everything is an excellent resource to educators,internet enthusiasts and students. Mr.Rosenberg takes on the task of giving us the story of the internet via the history of blogging according to him.The book offers a history of blogging beginnings and triumph, considering its impact on social, political, personal and business lives and providing talks of Blogger founders and innovators who [...]

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    6. This nonfiction book talks about the history of blogging and the people involved with its rise to popularity and ongoing conflict. Scott Rosenberg argues the significance of blogging with fact and personal experience. The book is intended for anyone who wants to learn about blogging and how it became what it is today. The purpose of the book is to give the reader a better understanding of blogging and its importance by talking about the history of blogging and it's many controversies.The main po [...]

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    7. I was fortunate enough to read the book “Say Everything” by: Scott Rosenberg. This book basically talks about how blogging began, what it’s become today and why it matter. For me personally, I always thought that blogging is something that is cool; even though I never blogged. My first interaction with blogging is when my classmates would mention that they would read or follow celebrity’s blog. After reading the book “Say Everything” I realized that blogging was the very first form o [...]

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    8. Have you ever wondered when blogging began? Maybe you were curious about the origin of the term “dooced.” Or possibly you’ve asked yourself, who the first person was to blog after the attacks on the World Trade Center? Scott Rosenberg wanted to know the answer to these questions and more. He took the answers he found and turned them into a book about blogging. “Say Anything” is a blogging history of sorts. Rosenberg touches on and interconnects how blogging began and how it evolved int [...]

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    9. Mr Rosenberg has done it again with "Say Everything". The last book, "[[ASIN:1400082471 Dreaming in Code: Two Dozen Programmers, Three Years, 4,732 Bugs, and One Quest for Transcendent Software]]" was one of my favorite books about being in the software trenches. in "Say Everything", Mr Rosenberg takes on a much bigger task - giving us the story of the internet via the very abridged history of blogging according to him. First the negatives, the book is very much centered on the "according to Mr. [...]

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    10. I'm reading Scott Rosenberg's Say Everything: How Blogging Began, What It's Becoming, and Why It Matters. Rosenberg wrote Dreaming In Code which I reviewed here and on my linkedin page more recently. I wasn't big on the book when I first saw it, but having finished Auletta's Googled Friday, I was in need of more reading material at lunch. Library's new book shelf provided respite.So far, it's excellent stuff. Rosenberg is a good writer with a keen sense of how to explain complicated technology.W [...]

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    11. This book is a history of blogging, and in part a defense of blogging as something valuable - an argument against its critics in the journalistic sphere. It's an easy enjoyable read. Rosenberg's writing style is light and conversational, and the narrative remains interesting and is detailed without becoming overwhelmed by minutiae.For me the best (and largest) part of the book is the history. Much of the material was new, even for events I somewhat remember from the time they happened. And while [...]

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    12. Off this review:Say Everything: How Blogging Began, What It’s Becoming, and Why It MattersBy Scott Rosenberg (Crown)Scott Rosenberg, co-founder of Salon, is behind this smart and surprising insider history of the first 15 years of the blogosphere. He takes a coolheaded look at blogging’s transformative characters and unexpected triumphs, crediting the form with sparking “a renaissance of personal literacy and social participation” as well as organizing, humanizing, and ultimately democra [...]

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    13. One Sentence Summary: Using profiles, interviews, and his own experience as a blogger, Rosenburg chronicles the history of blogging as a form and as an influence on society then tries to predict what might happen next.Two Sentence Review: Rosenberg’s profiles of early bloggers are interesting, but the book really hits it’s pace when Rosenberg points out the dramatic way blogs have turned traditional relationships and the democratic ideal upside down. This book is a must read for anyone inter [...]

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    14. Rosenberg tells the stories of the personalities that shaped blogging as it evolved and grew from the mid-1990s to 2008. The chapters that tell the stories of Blogger, Talking Points Memo, and the transformation from e-mail subscription lists to RSS feeds give great stories about each individual change. But Rosenberg strings each advance together to tell the story of blogs - of personal publishing.I used this book as part of my research primer for a graduate school project. The book was helpful [...]

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    15. Say Everything starts off like a history of what I had for dinner last week - blogging is such a recent phenomenon that it serves more as a reminder of sites I used to read and arguments that used to seem important. After recapping the last ten years or so there's a discussion of blogs vs. the MSM, the death spiral of print journalism and the cultural impact of blogging. Finally there's a look at the future of blogging in the context of Twitter and social networks. The latter sections were more [...]

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    16. I'm in the middle of a reading-books-about-blogs spree, and so this review is through that lens.This book was OK. It was a nice, well researched history of exactly when and how blogs advanced technologically, entered the public mind, really started changing things, etc.Unlike Here Comes Everyone, Free, or Cognitive Surplus, it had little to say in the way of theory, prediction, or helpful hints to do it yourself. More than anything, it was a book about research, not a book about new ideas.So it [...]

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    17. As genius/douchebag Harlan Ellison pointed out, "90% of everything is shit"; when it comes to blogs, I'm afraid the percentage is much higher. I don't mean to sound overly anti-democratic, but read this book and tell me it doesn't make you long for the pre-internet age of fewer monkeys with typewriters (and here I'm referring to Andrew Keen's insightful antidote to net-hype like Rosenberg's book, The Cult of the Amateur).

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    18. This was an interesting review of how technical advances in the ease of publishing have changed the way we record and share our lives and interact with others. This have changed quite a bit since it was written.

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    19. I read this as part of some research I am doing. It's an interesting and very broad overview of blogging. Not everyone's cup of tea but I really enjoyed reading it. For more:satia/2009/11/say

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    20. Too much gossip, too much fluff and too little in the way of the actual history of blogging for my tastes. I wasn't sure what to expect when I picked this one up, but it wasn't this. I came away with a sense that I had just attempted to make an entire meal out of cotton candy.

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    21. I found it interesting until I realized I didn't really want to read 400 pages about the history of blogging. At that point, I just skipped ahead and read the profiles of the people whose names I recognized :-)

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    22. Felt somewhat narrowly focused, but a decent overview of some of the blogging players. How does WordPress barely get a mention, though?

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    23. An interesting history of blogs and the people behind the very first ones. If you're a serious blogger, you should check it out.

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    24. If you want one book that documents the real history of blogging and a lucid explanation of how it is changing media, read Say Everything.

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    25. Another great time capsule for the state of the media in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Very easy to read.

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    26. Some really awesome narratives. Some really bad "extras." I feel like this book could have been more enjoyable if it were 200 pages long.

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    27. Very well researched, thorough, fairly interesting history.

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    28. It wasn't the most in-depth analysis, but overall it was a pretty interesting overview of the history of the blog. An easy read, to be sure.

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    29. Read for "Patron 2.0" paper.

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