The Wolves at the Door: The True Story of America's Greatest Female Spy

  • Title: The Wolves at the Door: The True Story of America's Greatest Female Spy
  • Author: Judith L. Pearson
  • ISBN: 9781592287628
  • Page: 299
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Wolves at the Door The True Story of America s Greatest Female Spy Virginia Hall left comfortable Balti roots of privilege in to follow her dream of becoming a Foreign Service Officer She watched as Hitler rolled into Poland then France and she decided to work
    Virginia Hall left comfortable Balti roots of privilege in 1931 to follow her dream of becoming a Foreign Service Officer She watched as Hitler rolled into Poland, then France, and she decided to work for the British Special Operations Executive SOE There she learned things her wealthy Balti contemporaries would never have imagined demolitions, assassination,Virginia Hall left comfortable Balti roots of privilege in 1931 to follow her dream of becoming a Foreign Service Officer She watched as Hitler rolled into Poland, then France, and she decided to work for the British Special Operations Executive SOE There she learned things her wealthy Balti contemporaries would never have imagined demolitions, assassination, secret radio communications, and resistance organization She was deployed to France where the Gestapo imprisoned, beat, and tortured spies Against such an ominous backdrop, Hall managed to locate drop zones for the money and weapons so badly needed by the French Resistance, helped escaped POWs and downed Allied airmen flee to England, and secured safe houses for agents in need.

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      Published :2019-010-05T22:55:31+00:00

    About Judith L. Pearson


    1. Award winning writer Judy Pearson s career began in a tree a wonderful old maple in her parents backyard, with a perfect branch on which to sit It was there, as a teenager, that she first wrote her thoughts on current events and life in general Now hundreds of thousands of words later, this Michigan native is still writing.A graduate of Michigan State University, Pearson has writes newspaper and magazine articles and has published three books The first two are biographies about ordinary people who exhibited extraordinary courage Belly of the Beast a POW s Inspiring True Story of Faith, Courage and Survival, and Wolves at the Door the True Story of America s Greatest Female Spy The latter has been optioned for a movie A life changing event caused Judy to depart from biographies to write her third book It s Just Hair 20 Essential Life Lessons The book is the first in a series of three, all involving 20 Lessons, all designed to help readers infuse their journey through life with courage and humor.The founder of Courage Concepts, an organization that cultivates courage in women, Pearson provides workshops and keynotes for corporations and organizations Judy is an active member of numerous organizations American Association of University Women, Michigan Professional Women s Resource, National Organization of Female Executives She is a member of the board of directors the Al Van Humane Society and the Beacon Club Several years ago, Judy returned to her idyllic little home town on the shores of Lake Michigan, where she lives with her husband And she still climbs trees


    649 Comments


    1. Well, I wish they would put this on the reading list for my old class, "Women and the American Experience," that I took at Harvard, but I think it might not be politically correct. This woman was so patriotically dedicated to her country that she circumvented and overcame all the obstacles set against her gender at the Dept of State and instead became the most wanted Allied spy in occupied France during WW II. Despite clear gender discrimination, by sheer dedication and determination, she rose t [...]

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    2. The Special Operations Executive, the British spy unit during WWII, sent around 480 agents into France to assist in the Resistance. Forty of those agents were women. The most honored of these is Virginia Hall, an American amputee. She was a radio transmitter, detonater, collaborator. For three years she escaped capture. She had strong instincts and great fortitude. After the war she joined the CIA. This is her story

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    3. This is the biography of Virginia Hill. She was an American citizen who lead a cosmopolitan European lifestyle/ work career during the 1930's and ultimately became entrenched in covert SOE operations. In fact she was one of the first and one of the most numerous "returners" to defeated Vichy France. Furthermore, she was the only woman operating her own entire section underground within the French resistance movement during WWII. She was totally an intrepid, incredible personality from her younge [...]

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    4. This is a very interesting true account. Because it is true, it reads more like a long newspaper or magazine report on a factual matter. I found the facts fascinating and came to a much greater understanding of the courage and importance of the people who formed the French Resistance. I did not know about Vichy France and its leaders in WWII. Reading about how many French had treated the Jews was shocking to me and gave me more background info on an excellent foreign DVD, Sarah's Key, I'd seen r [...]

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    5. While I can't really say this book was enjoyable due to the content, it was certainly informative and very interesting. Parts were rather difficult to read, due to what was being explained, but also, wasn't hidden or obfuscated. The chapters were a little long for my liking, but I would be interested to read more about unsung heroes of World War II.

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    6. The Wolves at the Door by Judith L. Pearson is subtitled 'The story of America's greatest female spy', and I don't think that is an exaggeration. Virginia Hall was born into a well-off American family and could have had a quiet life tending a Victory garden during the war. But she was an intelligent and ambitious woman, so she chose a different life.Before the start of WWII, Hall worked at several US consulates in Europe, trying to gain entrance to become a Foreign Sevice Officer. Her gender sto [...]

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    7. This was a good book (for a school book) I started it a while ago and it was my English reading. Judith is a great writer and Virginia's story was very entertaining. It kept me reading, which for a school book is amazing. The chapters were SUPER LONG. That was annoying because for school I like to read 1 chapter every day. I was okay though. Virginia had such a good life. 5 star book! I'm glad I read it!

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    8. I have learned many things from this book. I would recommend this book to anyone to read. It gives hope in times of trouble. It shows that even people who have disabalities capable of amazing things. In times of trouble Virgina Hall gave herself over to fighting Nazies in France because of the evil they were. SHe put her life in perial for years because of what she believed. I admire people who are able to give up all.

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    9. 4.5Well researched. Mostly well written. Incredible story of a remarkable woman, the SOE, OSS, and the resistance.

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    10. Great (true) story about an amazing women.

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    11. Virginia Hall was a fascinating woman, and Pearson's book really does her justice. I am as amazed by her willingness to keep going towards danger as I am impressed by her competence and shrewd instincts. I learned so much about the Resistance from this book.

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    12. A biographical account of the wartime experiences of American Virginia Hall who operated in Nazi occupied France as an officer for the British SOE (Secret Operation Executive) and later for the combined Intelligence operation through the American OSS (Office of Strategic Services) forerunner of the CIA. Ms. Hall was indeed a remarkable woman who's dream of a career in US foreign Service was cut short by a hunting accident that took her right leg below the knee. The accident would have discourage [...]

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    13. This is a fascinating account of the life of Virginia Hall, an American woman who was the first Special Operations Executive to be smuggled into France in May 1941. She was one of that breed who, frustrated by the pre-war glass ceiling, came into their own during World War II. Hall developed and ran a highly effective network, helping downed airmen to regain England, keeping SOE informed of German activities and everyday life in occupied France, coordinating air drops of supplies and agents and, [...]

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    14. Granted, Judith Pearson does an amazing job of researching the material for this book, but she needs to find better editors. I read this as part of my book club requirement. The subject matter was interesting, and there was a lot of information about WWII which you would not find covered in a high school history class, more's the pity.It seems to me that Virginia maintained her "spy at a moment" mode because of how private she was and determined to keep her life in espionage alive. There must ha [...]

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    15. The Wolves at the Door tells the little known tale of Judith Pearson, who was a spy in occupied France during World War II. Judith Pearson's story is one full of risk, courage and intrigue. With one leg amputated below the knee due to an accident in her youth, Pearson was still able to accomplish feats which would have been difficult for anyone. Her story is as remarkable as the woman herself. Pearson was unfazed by danger, and willingly undertook missions which were extremely dangerous. She ove [...]

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    16. Virginia Hall was a woman with a huge capital W! Thanks to her and other's like her the Nazis were defeated and the European countries liberated. Virginia played a very important role in France's Resistance during the WW2. She was courageous, smart, with a good sixth sense. During the WW2 she lived a life full of danger, death, uncertainty One would think that a book about her must have been interesting, engaging and readable. But unfortunately it wasn't. During the reading I felt like reading a [...]

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    17. Drove an ambulance from the front lines through the French countryside despite constant shelling from the German Army, returning months later to Nazi-occupied France to gather/report intelligence, recruit/organize Resistance members, establish safehouses, aid downed Allied pilots & bombers, set up supply drop-sites, meet up with & supply local guerilla forces and then escape by train - then by foot over the Pyrennes - only to return again in disguise(despite a price on her head) to do it [...]

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    18. I was impressed with this true story and all the daring missions that Virginia Hall, the "greatest female spy" accomplished during WW2. I just didn't love the writing style. The writing was dry with minimal dialogue--too much telling and not enough showing. Virginia didn't seem very human, but maybe spies aren't supposed to act like humans?

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    19. It was alright, an honest and what seemed to be accurate portrayal of a female spy during WWII. It never really grabbed me though. One great part while attempting to flee France and get back to England.

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    20. This is a more interesting, descriptive book review on . (amazon/The-Wolves-Door)

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    21. What an amazing woman Virginia Hall is! Courageous, intelligent and determined, this woman didn't let her physical disability define her life.

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    22. extraordinary individual!!

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    23. Anyone who doubts that gender parity can exist should read this account. Most older Americans living during the period of this story would probably have been biased against women, Black Americans, Native Americans, etc. This very determined lady, Virginia Hall, and her story would cause all of them to reassess their beliefs. And now in this day and age when discrimination of all stripes is crumbing this story proves to us that any individual at any time in history can overcome great obstacles. I [...]

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    24. Virginia Hall was probably the last person you would expect to become a spy and a resistance leader in WWII France. Among other things, she came from a privileged American family, spoke French with a noticeably American accent -- oh, and she had a wooden leg (she nicknamed it Cuthbert). Yet, for her outstanding service, she was awarded superior medals by all three of the major Allies. However, the enemy called her, "the most dangerous of all Allied spies," and they put out WANTED posters marking [...]

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    25. This is the story of WWII hero Virginia Hall. She became an amputee in her early twenties but was still able to become a spy working for the British and American intelligence agencies entrenched in Nazi occupied France. Among other duties she was a radio operator communicating with London about German troops in France & places for parachuted night drops of much needed supplies. She organized with others to secretly meet & disperse the supplies. Just prior to D Day she helped others to ha [...]

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    26. An interesting and easy read about an extraordinary woman. Virginia Hall was an American who, in spite of a significant physical handicap, went to work supporting the French Resistance in its fight against the occupying Nazis. Hall joined the fight before America joined the war for no other reason than because of the evil and cruelty of Hitler and the Nazis. During the war, Hall worked undercover with both the British SOE and the American OSS in her support of the Resistance. A compelling read a [...]

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    27. There is a line in the obit of one of my all-time favorite judges, Shirley Levittan, which reads "During World War II, she was attached to the Office of Strategic Services in Paris, London and Germany." When I came across Judith Pearson's book on Virginia Hall it seemed like a chance to understand what it might have been like to be parachuted behind enemy lines to fight in the French Resistance. The book did not disappoint. I think it is tremendously difficult to write about those dark chapters [...]

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    28. I loved this book, learning about Virginia Hall, one of the most wanted British Resistance spies during WWII. Reading about her life was incredibly inspiring; she was a true war hero, and an amputee with stunning leadership skills and a humble and brave spirit. I learned a lot about WWII, having not known much about the mechanics of war. Some of it of course was horrific to learn, but all of it was necessary to the story and it made me hunger to know more.

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    29. Fascinating story told in a rather dry and cursory way. I can imagine that this would make a wonderful movie. Virginia Hall was fearless and lived her life dedicated to fighting oppression. She aspired to work in the state department but was denied a job. She moved to Europe and worked with the British and the French Resistance to fight the German take-over of France. Oh, and she lost her leg in a shooting accident. Definitely a fascinating woman!

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    30. This was an enjoyable read about a person of great courage and determination, a person I knew nothing about. I now know quite a bit about her, and appreciate that.But this is a spy story and I wanted to get sweaty palms while hoping she survives the Nazis in WWII France. Instead I felt I was looking through the lens at a person far in the distance. I wanted to experience her dangerous life, not to be told she lived a dangerous life.

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