The Year 1000: What Life Was Like At the Turn of the First Millennium

  • Title: The Year 1000: What Life Was Like At the Turn of the First Millennium
  • Author: Robert Lacey Danny Danziger
  • ISBN: 9780316643757
  • Page: 313
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Year What Life Was Like At the Turn of the First Millennium In the year the world was one of mystery and magicians monks warriors and wandering merchants people who feared an apocalypse and people who had no idea what year it was or what lay beyond the
    In the year 1000 the world was one of mystery and magicians, monks, warriors and wandering merchants people who feared an apocalypse and people who had no idea what year it was or what lay beyond the nearest valley It was a world of dark forests and Viking adventures in which fear was real and death a constant companion People felt they walked hand in hand with God, anIn the year 1000 the world was one of mystery and magicians, monks, warriors and wandering merchants people who feared an apocalypse and people who had no idea what year it was or what lay beyond the nearest valley It was a world of dark forests and Viking adventures in which fear was real and death a constant companion People felt they walked hand in hand with God, and envisaged him so literally that even Christians were sometimes buried with supplies for the journey to the new life in heaven Narrated through the progression of the seasons, this book presents a recreation of English life at the end of the first millennium AD.

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    About Robert Lacey Danny Danziger


    1. Robert Lacey is a British historian noted for his original research, which gets him close to and often living alongside his subjects He is the author of numerous international bestsellers.After writing his first works of historical biography, Robert, Earl of Essex and Sir Walter Ralegh, Robert wrote Majesty, his pioneering biography of Queen Elizabeth II Published in 1977, Majesty remainsacknowledged as the definitive study of British monarchy a subject on which the author continues to write and lecture around the world, appearing regularly on ABC s Good Morning America and on CNN s Larry King Live.The Kingdom, a study of Saudi Arabia published in 1981, is similarly acknowledged as required reading for businessmen, diplomats and students all over the world To research The Kingdom, Robert and his wife Sandi took their family to live for eighteen months beside the Red Sea in Jeddah Going out into the desert, this was when Robert earned his title as the method actor of contemporary biographers.In March 1984 Robert Lacey took his family to live in Detroit, Michigan, to write Ford the Men and the Machine, a best seller on both sides of the Atlantic which formed the basis for the TV mini series of the same title, starring Cliff Robertson.Robert s other books include biographies of the gangster Meyer Lansky, Princess Grace of Monaco and a study of Sotheby s auction house He co authored The Year 1000 An Englishman s World, a description of life at the turn of the last millennium In 2002, the Golden Jubilee Year of Queen Elizabeth II, he published Royal Monarch in America , hailed by Andrew Roberts in London s Sunday Telegraph as compulsively readable , and by Martin Amis in The New Yorker as definitive.With the publication of his Great Tales Robert Lacey returns to his first love history.


    162 Comments


    1. ‘The Year 1000’ written by Robert Lacey and Danny Danziger – a combination of a historian and a journalist – is a time travel back to the Anglo-Saxon England of 1000 A.D, offering the reader a unique opportunity to inspect and experience its daily life. The reader will meet and observe how average Anglo-Saxon’s carried on with their routine life thereby offering delightful and often charming insights into the history of England as it was at the turn of the first millennium. Written aft [...]

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    2. I read the month chapters in this book at start of corresponding months in my life. Sometimes I'll read (book) December in (real) August just to remind me of what I would be doing in the cold months 1000 years ago. This is one of the most engaging non-fiction books I've ever read, and all the better for being medieval. Probably the only history book I can read again and again and never get tired of it! I love the little details about everyday life, like what their clothes were made from, what th [...]

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    3. (view spoiler)[Bettie's books (hide spoiler)]

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    4. An interesting and well-written journey back in time. Well-researched and organized based on the Julius Work Calendar, a time capsule of drawings that gives us hints about what life was like for ordinary folks more than 1,000 years ago. "What C.S. Lewis called the 'snobbery of chronology' encourages us to presume that just because we happen to have lived after our ancestors and can read books which give us some account of what happened to them, we must also know better than them. We certainly ha [...]

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    5. A very nice, vividly impressionistic, deeply atmospheric and compelling (but also accurate and well-researched) sketch of how life was in England around the year 1000. Inspired by the Julius Work Calendar, the narrative is cast in the form of a calendar: it describes the social and cultural environment and the everyday life and habits that many conventional history books tend to bypass, reflecting the rhythms of life during this fascinating period. Thoroughly enjoyable, insightful, entertaining [...]

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    6. I always re-read this before going into first draft of the Lumatere fantasy novels.

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    7. I rarely give a book 5 stars but this short book on THE YEAR 1000 was just about a perfect example of its kind. It was short, and for me right now short is a good thing. There was almost no repetition. The authors knew what they wanted to say, how they wanted to organize the information, and they kept to their plan.In addition it was extremely readable. The book hooked me early on and kept me hooked. I already knew a lot of what they wanted to say, but there was also quite a lot I didn't know.Th [...]

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    8. What a delightfully informative little book! I don't know how they crammed so much information into just 200 pages (reminds me of Mark Kurlansky's Cod: A Biography of the Fish That Changed the World and this one doesn't have recipes). The authors take something called the Julius Work Calendar, a medieval reminder of work and faith with wonderful illustrations at the bottom of each month's page reproduced at the beginning of each chapter of the book and explained in the following text, to illustr [...]

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    9. A very quick read, definitely not scholarly work, popular history I would call it. I liked the author’s choice of format for this book. Like an almanac, each chapter is dedicated to a month of the calendar year and describes the traditional activities and the fest days celebrated in that month, interspersed by references to historical figures and famous events.The topics range from curious facts, kings and saints, practical medicine, common beliefs (mix of religion, paganism and superstition), [...]

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    10. Much of what we know about the first millennium comes from a book written around 1020 called The Julius Work Calendar. It is the earliest surviving example of the English daily routine, "the schedule of the earth, and the life of the spirit." The ink used to put the characters on paper is interesting in itself. It was tapped from oak trees boils, created by wasps that had gnawed at the bark to lay eggs. In self defense, the tree formed a gall that was filled with a clear acid. The ink was called [...]

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    11. The Year 1000 (1999) is a tasty nibblet of late Anglo-Saxon history that you can polish off in an afternoon. Lacey's prose is light but still satisfying without being the slightest bit dry. Here is a sampler of some of the interesting tidbits I culled: July was the hungriest month of the year, since by then all last year's grain was eaten and this year's had yet to mature. Anglo-Saxon society was in some ways wonderfully simple, revolving around minuscule villages, spread out all over the countr [...]

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    12. This was a relatively light-weight look at a specific inflection point in the past. I generally like history books that attempt to humanize a time and place, rather than chronicle political achievements. This book does that pretty well - I got a sense of what the food was like, how the villages in England worked then, and the anxiety people felt around things like a toothache (chances where you'd die from most ailments back then.)However, even more interesting is how this book reflects more on w [...]

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    13. I love the way Robert Lacey approaches history. He truly does make it come alive and gives the stories and that is what makes history worth studying, for me, anyway. And the fact that this work is based on the Julius Work Calendar of 1000, which I got to see in the British Library, makes it that much more thrilling for me. I believe, more and more each day, that we need to know our history. Lacey's works are a good way to get it.

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    14. Pull back the curtains and take a peek at life in Anglo-Saxon England by reading The Year 1000: What Life Was Like at the Turn of the First Millennium by Robert Lacey and Danny Danzinger. This is a delightful trip back in time. By piecing together interviews with an impressive number of scholars in the field and conducting extensive research as evidenced by their notes and bibliography, the authors provide a unique perspective on what life must have been like at the turn of the first millennium. [...]

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    15. This was a very interesting, informative book.Each chapter did a split-focus, informing about a particular month and a particular aspect of society (generally associated with that month). For example, March and food, or July and food scarcity.Lots of references, lots of small and large bits of info. If you are interested in this time period and in England, then I whole-heartedly recommend this book.

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    16. This book is a compact "history" of the year 1000 in England, chapters each themed around a month of the Julian calendar, and fairly readable and interesting. Not a wow book, but not super time consuming either.One thing I definitely came away with from this book: the world is certainly a dangerous place now, but it was much more dangerous back then! Everyone seemed a day away from a bad situation, either due to raids by marauding Vikins and invaders, or due to disease, or as a redult of childbi [...]

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    17. Mediocre to good, but it's a quick and easy read. The central conceit-- which is not advertised anywhere in the book, presumably to make it more palatable to people buying it for the Y2K novelty when it was originally published-- is deeper than it seems. The book takes you through a medieval calendar and talks about the cultural associations with that month, the traditions, the holidays, and the work of the average peasant. As books about the average person are punishingly rare, especially for t [...]

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    18. The layout of this book was fantastic, Lacey used the Julian calendar's twelve months to divide life into twelve chapters. It was highly readable and would appeal to the scholar as well as casual reader. One of my favorite parts of the book was his discussion on the break of the first millennium in 1000 AD. There was a great medieval version of the Y2K hysteria that really hit the spot.

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    19. A brief, pithy, serviceable survey of English life on the eve of the Norman Conquest.

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    20. Much like Thomas Cahill, Lacey & Danziger manage to distill centuries of ancient history in an concise, approachable, relatable story. And much like Cahill, these two authors upend a number of presumptions about the so-called Dark Ages.Definitely a good read for anyone who is interested in Anglo-Saxon England.

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    21. A short and stylish little book that rewards the reader with a wealth of information. Effortless learning.

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    22. I liked this book, hence the three stars I gave it. It was easy and smooth to read and put a lot of things into perspective, unlike other history books I've cracked open. This held me from the moment I read the first sentence and it kept me hooked until the very end. Also, being written just before the second millenium and the Y2K hullabaloo, there is much reference to how we in modern times are much like our predecessors in our view of the magnitude of an approaching new millenium, therefore, h [...]

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    23. This was a quick read about life in medieval Engla-lond around the year 1000. It was written just before 2000 so it compared the apprehension that people felt as 1000 approached with the jitters people felt as 2000 grew near. The chapters in the book were organized by the months of the year thanks to an illustrated calendar that was made at the time. It gives a really broad overview of what life was like without getting bogged down in the specifics of who did what when, although that stuff is im [...]

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    24. A good read. This tells about life in the year 1000, with a bit of drift earlier and later as the authors pull in stories of interesting incidents around that time. They have structured it around a calendar that was made in England around 1000 AD. The calendar was illustrated with line drawings reproduced in this book and they have a chapter for each month of the year.The economy in England in 1000 AD was driven by the seasons so the different months had specific characteristics. For instance Ju [...]

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    25. An excellent little book, and one of the most readable history books I've encountered. I finished it in two sittings.Basically, it's a collection of anecdotes about life in the Anglo-Saxon era, written in the framework of a calendar. There's a little background information on the (familiar to me) political events of the period, but for the most part this is about everyday life.Topics covered include: medicine, charms and disease; agriculture; materials; food and drink; psychology and plenty more [...]

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    26. Very interesting details about the world of AngloSaxon England around the reign of Alfred the Great and the Norman Invasion. The central focus of the book is a surviving manuscript called the Julius Calendar which is a kind of guide to each of the months of the year. The authors point out that really very little is known about this period, but enough survives to fill a fascinating lttle book.Because I am reading a series of historical novels by Bernard Cornwell called the Saxon Stories which are [...]

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    27. A quick read for such a dense book-- chock full of interesting information on what day-to-day life in the Year 1000 would be (mostly concerned with English daily life). For example, the book opens with details of the formation and adoption of the Julian Calendar, and says that in the 700-somethings:"Such was the confusion in those days that Easter was sometimes kept twice in one year, so that when the King had ended Lent and was keeping Easter, the Queen and her attendants were still fasting and [...]

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    28. An excellent book for the person that does not what to feel like they are reading a history book, but rather a story book about history. It is a book that can be read countless times. Lacey and Danziger have compiled an excellent novel that reminds us that the populations of the medieval world were not statistics, but real people with hopes, dreams, and a lot of the same problems as the modern man.

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    29. Lacey and Danziger wrote this in 1999 as a reminder that millennial milestones have come and gone before without major cataclysm. The Year 1000 is a month-by-month look at what life was like in England a thousand years ago. It's a quick and easy read, suitable for the amateur or occasional historian. Interesting, anecdotal and down-to-earth. Whereas so many medieval histories focus on the high and mighty, this book takes a look at the common folk.

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    30. I love nothing better than reading about the daily life of eras past, with a real peek into what folks did with themselves. This one gives glimpses but doesn't dig very deep. In linking each chapter with a month from a work calendar, it tackles twelve different aspects of daily living, each of which could easily be expounded upon to become its own book. It was nicely written and well-researched, but reads much like a primer and I wish I had gotten something more in-depth.

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