Behindlings

  • Title: Behindlings
  • Author: Nicola Barker
  • ISBN: 9780002005418
  • Page: 134
  • Format: None
  • Behindlings Behindlings the fifth novel from Nicola Barker is a welcome return both in mood and in geography to the gothic terrain of her Impac Prize winner Wide Open Set in parochial Canvey Island Essex th
    Behindlings, the fifth novel from Nicola Barker, is a welcome return, both in mood and in geography, to the gothic terrain of her Impac Prize winner Wide Open Set in parochial Canvey Island, Essex, this book is inventive, funny, unnerving, and often magnificently strange Barker s Canvey once dubbed Candy Island by Daniel Defoe is, with its Wimpy Bar, dreary pubs, andBehindlings, the fifth novel from Nicola Barker, is a welcome return, both in mood and in geography, to the gothic terrain of her Impac Prize winner Wide Open Set in parochial Canvey Island, Essex, this book is inventive, funny, unnerving, and often magnificently strange Barker s Canvey once dubbed Candy Island by Daniel Defoe is, with its Wimpy Bar, dreary pubs, and long cherished grudges, rumours, and secrets, a quintessentially English small town Its emotionally damaged population is augmented by the Behindlings of the title, a gaggle of oddballs who follow, or precisely obsessively stalk, the novel s enigmatic central character, Wesley The architect of a chocolate company funded treasure hunt, author of a pseudo Nietzschean walking guide and the man behind the daring theft of an antique pond, he is a rather malevolent Pied Piper Part Alvin Toffler quoting, peripatetic environmental visionary, part immoral and maybe downright evil fraudster, he s also notorious for feeding the fingers on his right hand to an eagle owl in an act of penance for accidentally killing his brother Barker has always had a penchant for the surreal, and occasionally here both plot and characterization can get swamped in flights of absurdist imagination She is perhaps too fond of the elaborate simile The clackety, clackety of the like and as of her prose style is, from time to time, a little exasperating Despite this, her narrative is so alluringly, so charmingly odd, bristling with puzzles and etymological games and full of wonderfully, devilishly comic touches, that it s easy to ignore its minor flaws Travis Elborough,

    • ☆ Behindlings || ✓ PDF Read by Ø Nicola Barker
      134 Nicola Barker
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ Behindlings || ✓ PDF Read by Ø Nicola Barker
      Posted by:Nicola Barker
      Published :2019-09-26T00:42:35+00:00

    About Nicola Barker


    1. Librarian Note There is than one author in the database with this name.Nicola Barker is an English writer.Nicola Barker s eight previous novels include Darkmans short listed for the 2007 Man Booker and Ondaatje prizes, and winner of the Hawthornden Prize , Wide Open winner of the 2000 International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award , and Clear long listed for the Man Booker Prize in 2004 She has also written two prize winning collections of short stories, and her work has been translated into than twenty languages She lives in East London.


    851 Comments


    1. Hmm. Here is a messy review of what is a messy novel. Pros: Frequent, but not so frequently to save the book, delightfully clever descriptions. Several of the characters were colourful and intriguing, and held my interest (others, less so). The central idea of a group of people following a mysterious bloke for various uncertain reasons was an interesting one and posed plenty of thought-provoking questions. Readable enough to get through, with a bit of a struggle. Cons: Confusing. Strange for the [...]

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    2. Last night I finished reading Nicola Barker’s monolithic novel Behindlings: an über-manic triumph for the imagination wired on a diet of speedball and Dr. Pepper. Barker is one of the most venerated novelists of her generation, winning the Impac Award at the turn of the millennium, and has been raking in the prizes and wonga ever since.Behindlings is a throbbing headache of a novel. Her language kept me smiling and giggling for the first 200 pages – when her talent knew no fault, when her l [...]

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    3. This was one of the more confusing books I've read in the last few years, but ultimately, also one of the most satisfying; I spent the first half banging my head against the wall because there was just so much stuff going on, and the second half shouting around my fist because it was falling together in completely crazy, unexpected ways. Very enjoyable! Most definitely a great read to ring in 2008! I'd certainly look for more of Barker's books after this.

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    4. God this was difficult. I'm in two minds about it. On the one hand there are some outbursts of exceptionally fine writing, like this from chapter ten:“Dewi chewed solemnly on a heavily-salted tomato sandwich as he peered through his living room window, his dust-iced skin zebraed by the sharp stripes of winter light which gushed, unapologetically – like hordes of white-frocked debutantes flashing their foaming silk petticoats in eager curtsies – between the regimented slats of his hand-buil [...]

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    5. This is the second book in Barker's Thames Gateway series, although I'm not entirely sure where the 'series' part is as the characters are different, the subject is different and the location is different. Maybe it's a British thing I don't understand. Anyway, the premise of the story is quirky and interesting. Like Wide Open, the reader enters the story where the characters pretty much know everything and it is a process to reveal it to the reader. I thought there were pieces of the story that [...]

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    6. This book was great fun. I love Barker's weird imagination - to create such a strange cult character like Wesley is a feat. The story line is linear but written like a mystery novel - you don't get all the details, there are plenty of loose ends left open to the imagination, and she builds her characters slowly and systematically. I didn't give it a 5, however, because her writing style drives me insane. Where was her editor? If she was trying for stream of consciousness, she DIDN'T nail it. The [...]

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    7. I started this book forever-ago, and I should have kept at it and focused on finishing it in a much more timely manner. But I didn't -- the book hardly kept my attention for a full chapter at a time, so I kept putting it down and going back to it every now and then. As a result, I easily confused the characters and forgot who some were all together. This woman is an amazing writer and I'm sure this book is infinitely interesting, but it is very slow (on purpose, I believe) and often confusing, w [...]

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    8. Move over Coe, there's a new favourite author in town. Barker's writing reminds me of why I fell in love with books in the first place. You read on, having no idea what's going to happen next (or, invariably, what's happening now) and, frankly, it doesn't matter because the here and now is such a pleasurable place to be, thanks to her gleefully joyful descriptions, similes and random tangents. What it never is, though, is twee, idyllic comedy: she's sufficiently potty-mouthed and downright nasty [...]

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    9. I could not get into this book at all. One reviewer said it was "twee" -- good word for it.

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    10. i found it bizarre and aggravating but strangely compelling

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    11. Lezen-for-life boek nummer 1: 'Behindlings' van Nicola Barker.I like my books to be out of the ordinary. Luckily, I can count on Nicola Barker to deliver exactly what I want: Wesley steals antique ponds, sleeps inside horses, eats seabirds and is very keen on middle-aged librarians. So, obviously, he has a magnetic effect on people and has developed quite a following, the Behindlings as he calls them. Together they embark on 500+ pages of wicked fun.

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    12. This feels like the dry run for Darkmans; similarly complex approach to world-building through characters rather than telling a story with a clear, linear plot. The problem was that many of the characters were a bit one-dimensional. And the plot, once you figure it out, is a bit disappointing. Wesley holds the whole thing together. He is terrible in so many ways but fascinating. It's somehow believable that people follow him around.

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    13. Wesley has eaten mostly seabirds in the past two months, Walks the perimeter of Canvey Island every morning (seventeen miles to be exact), and is fond of middle-aged librarians. For those who Follow, it's become confounding, because he usually moves on after a couple of days.Prepare to be equally confounded with "Behindlings," a literary blender slopping out half-spoken bits of dialogue and little bits of scavenger hunt detritus. Nicola Barker has essentially written a sharp-tongued mystery. As [...]

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    14. It's hard to describe Nicola Barker's writing. At times, this book seems to be just a lot of nonsense happenings, and it's difficult to fully figure out what's going on - even after finishing, I still can't say I have, but oddly, that didn't detract from my enjoyment, and I love her writing anyway. There's something about it for me that's hard to pinpoint, but I can say that the oddity of the characters and events has a great appeal to me. She's a "new" author to me, but is a UK author who's bee [...]

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    15. I think this book was too British for me, although I endured throughout the beginning with an endless sea of metaphors, seriously if the metaphors would be reduced to a minimum the book wouldn't be as long and wouldn't be so exhausting to finish. And the overuse of adjectives, felt like Nicola Barker was writing the novel with a thesaurus next to her. But the payoff was good, the reveals at the end on how the novel comes all together is rewarding and it gives a sense of human nature with all its [...]

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    16. I have given up on this. I have become totally weary of the author's overuse of metaphor on page after page. She piles one on top of another. I've reached pages 164/165 and find three paragraphs using double or triple or quadruple metaphors on those two pages alone. Ok Ms Barker, you have a wonderful command of English but do you really need to show off quite as much? I thought this went out with Gerald Manley Hopkins

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    17. Nicola Barker is not for everyone. She's got a steam-of-consciousness technique that takes some effort, but it's mostly worth it. I didn't enjoy Behindlings as much as Darkmans, however; none of the characters really had a chance to make an impression. I couldn't really understand why Wesley was so compelling, for instance. If a guy is going to inspire a literal following, I would like to see some evidence for it. It was worth the read, but probably not a good entry point for her work.

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    18. Maybe this would make more sense if I'd read the first one? Although a review said they're only based in the same world so it doesn't matter. I just wasn't in the mood to stick with it more than 120 pages. But I like the author's style so I may try other books by her.

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    19. twee in a way i didn't particularly enjoy; always the threat of something sinister on the horizon, never delivered. though i did enjoy the reindeer quite a bit.

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    20. pretty interesting characters but a fucking bear to read. so many odd meanderings

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    21. Author on the 2007 Booker List

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    22. If you enjoy Last of the Summer Wine (British tv program) you will probably like this book - although it is basically without a plot, nevertheless it is compelling.

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    23. Stopping for now. Maybe I'll take a run at it later.

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    24. I've ground to a halt with this - a great book but lack of plot means it's a bit too put-downable. I hope to pick it up again some day!

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    25. Odd book, but quite interesting

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    26. I think this book had one of my favorite endings ever!

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    27. The book is really brilliant, in its way, but it's also extremely gimmicky. You decide.

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    28. I'd cast RDJ as Wesley and Helena Bonham Carter as Katherine. Plot slows WAY down towards the end and the short exchanges of thoughts and unfinished sentences are bothersome. But I do like her style.

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